Efficacy of computed tomographic image - Guided endoscopic sinus surgery in residency training programs

Roy R Casiano, William A. Numa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To determine the efficacy of computed tomographic image-guided endoscopic surgery in the hands of inexperienced surgeons. Study Design: Four second-year otolaryngology residents, with no prior experience performing ethmoidectomies, performed endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) on formalin-fixed human cadaveric specicimens with and without the aid of computer-assisted surgery (CAS). Methods: Each resident was asked to identify critical sinus, orbital, and skull base structures while performing a total ethmoidectomy and multiple sinusotomies. Their surgical accuracy (percentage of correctly identified structures), total operative time, and incidence of major complications were recorded for each side. A total of 16 sides were evaluated (8 with and 8 without CAS). Statistical significance between groups was determined by means of Pearson's χ2 analysis. Results: Statistical analysis showed a significant difference (P = .001) in the mean accuracy of identifying critical anatomical landmarks between the CAS (97%) and non-CAS (76.8%) groups. Although not statistically significant, operative time appeared to be longer in the group using CAS (average of 67 vs. 80 min). Three major intracranial complications were documented only in the group not using CAS. Conclusions: Although, unquestionably, a thorough knowledge of the anatomy remains essential for performing ESS, CAS improves surgical accuracy and reduces the risk of major intracranial or intraorbital complications for residents. In additional, our data suggest that this technology may enhance surgical efficiency and improve the learning curve by reducing operative time (below one's normal baseline) while maintaining a greater than 90% accuracy in identifying critical anatomical landmarks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1277-1282
Number of pages6
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume110
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 29 2000

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Computer-Assisted Surgery
Internship and Residency
Education
Operative Time
Learning Curve
Skull Base
Otolaryngology
Formaldehyde
Anatomy
Technology
Efficiency
Incidence

Keywords

  • Computed tomography
  • Computed-assisted surgery
  • Endoscopic sinus surgery

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Efficacy of computed tomographic image - Guided endoscopic sinus surgery in residency training programs. / Casiano, Roy R; Numa, William A.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 110, No. 8, 29.08.2000, p. 1277-1282.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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