Efficacy of a Spanish-Language Self-Administered Stress Management Training intervention for Latinas undergoing chemotherapy

Aasha I. Hoogland, Suzanne C Lechner, Brian D. Gonzalez, Brent J. Small, Dinorah M. Tyson, Yasmin Asvat, Anna Barata, Maria F. Gomez, Yvelise Rodriguez, Heather S.L. Jim, Michael H Antoni, Paul B. Jacobsen, Cathy D. Meade

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cancer patients often report increased stress during chemotherapy. Stress management training has been shown to reduce this adverse outcome, but few interventions exist for Spanish-speaking Hispanic and Latina women (Latinas). Methods: Following community feedback (including focus groups/in-depth interviews), we transcreated the Spanish-Language Self-Administered Stress Management Training (SL-SAT) intervention based on our previously developed and implemented English-based intervention. Latinas about to begin chemotherapy were randomized to SL-SAT (n = 121) or usual care (n = 119). A Spanish-speaking interventionist met with SL-SAT participants who received the SL-SAT toolkit containing instructions in 3 well-established stress management techniques (deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery, and use of coping self-statements). Usual care participants received an educational booklet about coping with chemotherapy. All patients were instructed by nurses on their chemotherapy medications and given a resource listing of local support groups. Outcomes were obtained at baseline, and 7 and 13 weeks after starting chemotherapy. Primary outcomes included anxiety and depression, cancer-related distress, emotional well-being, and spiritual well-being. Secondary outcomes included functional well-being, social/family well-being, physical well-being, symptom severity, and self-efficacy for managing stress. Data were analyzed by using mixed models. Results: In both groups, improvements were observed in emotional well-being (P =.01), and declines were observed in functional well-being (P =.05), and physical well-being (P <.0001). Symptom severity increased across the follow-up period (P <.001). Conclusions: To be effective, stress management interventions for Latinas receiving chemotherapy may necessitate more attention from an interventionist, delivery of the intervention over a longer interval, and/or a group-based format.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1305-1311
Number of pages7
JournalPsycho-Oncology
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

Fingerprint

Hispanic Americans
Language
Drug Therapy
Autogenic Training
Pamphlets
Self-Help Groups
Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Self Efficacy
Focus Groups
Neoplasms
Respiration
Anxiety
Nurses
Interviews
Depression

Keywords

  • cancer
  • chemotherapy
  • Latinas
  • oncology
  • stress management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Oncology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Hoogland, A. I., Lechner, S. C., Gonzalez, B. D., Small, B. J., Tyson, D. M., Asvat, Y., ... Meade, C. D. (2018). Efficacy of a Spanish-Language Self-Administered Stress Management Training intervention for Latinas undergoing chemotherapy. Psycho-Oncology, 27(4), 1305-1311. https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.4673

Efficacy of a Spanish-Language Self-Administered Stress Management Training intervention for Latinas undergoing chemotherapy. / Hoogland, Aasha I.; Lechner, Suzanne C; Gonzalez, Brian D.; Small, Brent J.; Tyson, Dinorah M.; Asvat, Yasmin; Barata, Anna; Gomez, Maria F.; Rodriguez, Yvelise; Jim, Heather S.L.; Antoni, Michael H; Jacobsen, Paul B.; Meade, Cathy D.

In: Psycho-Oncology, Vol. 27, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 1305-1311.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hoogland, AI, Lechner, SC, Gonzalez, BD, Small, BJ, Tyson, DM, Asvat, Y, Barata, A, Gomez, MF, Rodriguez, Y, Jim, HSL, Antoni, MH, Jacobsen, PB & Meade, CD 2018, 'Efficacy of a Spanish-Language Self-Administered Stress Management Training intervention for Latinas undergoing chemotherapy', Psycho-Oncology, vol. 27, no. 4, pp. 1305-1311. https://doi.org/10.1002/pon.4673
Hoogland, Aasha I. ; Lechner, Suzanne C ; Gonzalez, Brian D. ; Small, Brent J. ; Tyson, Dinorah M. ; Asvat, Yasmin ; Barata, Anna ; Gomez, Maria F. ; Rodriguez, Yvelise ; Jim, Heather S.L. ; Antoni, Michael H ; Jacobsen, Paul B. ; Meade, Cathy D. / Efficacy of a Spanish-Language Self-Administered Stress Management Training intervention for Latinas undergoing chemotherapy. In: Psycho-Oncology. 2018 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 1305-1311.
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abstract = "Background: Cancer patients often report increased stress during chemotherapy. Stress management training has been shown to reduce this adverse outcome, but few interventions exist for Spanish-speaking Hispanic and Latina women (Latinas). Methods: Following community feedback (including focus groups/in-depth interviews), we transcreated the Spanish-Language Self-Administered Stress Management Training (SL-SAT) intervention based on our previously developed and implemented English-based intervention. Latinas about to begin chemotherapy were randomized to SL-SAT (n = 121) or usual care (n = 119). A Spanish-speaking interventionist met with SL-SAT participants who received the SL-SAT toolkit containing instructions in 3 well-established stress management techniques (deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation and guided imagery, and use of coping self-statements). Usual care participants received an educational booklet about coping with chemotherapy. All patients were instructed by nurses on their chemotherapy medications and given a resource listing of local support groups. Outcomes were obtained at baseline, and 7 and 13 weeks after starting chemotherapy. Primary outcomes included anxiety and depression, cancer-related distress, emotional well-being, and spiritual well-being. Secondary outcomes included functional well-being, social/family well-being, physical well-being, symptom severity, and self-efficacy for managing stress. Data were analyzed by using mixed models. Results: In both groups, improvements were observed in emotional well-being (P =.01), and declines were observed in functional well-being (P =.05), and physical well-being (P <.0001). Symptom severity increased across the follow-up period (P <.001). Conclusions: To be effective, stress management interventions for Latinas receiving chemotherapy may necessitate more attention from an interventionist, delivery of the intervention over a longer interval, and/or a group-based format.",
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AU - Lechner, Suzanne C

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AU - Small, Brent J.

AU - Tyson, Dinorah M.

AU - Asvat, Yasmin

AU - Barata, Anna

AU - Gomez, Maria F.

AU - Rodriguez, Yvelise

AU - Jim, Heather S.L.

AU - Antoni, Michael H

AU - Jacobsen, Paul B.

AU - Meade, Cathy D.

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