Efficacy and morbidity of therapeutic renal embolization in the spectrum of urologic disease

Avi I. Jacobson, S. A. Amukele, Robert Marcovich, O. Shapiro, R. Shetty, J. P. Aldana, Benjamin R. Lee, Arthur D. Smith, D. N. Siegel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: We report the largest series of renal embolizations performed for a variety of indications. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on embolizations performed in our institution from 1997 to 2002 encompassing 36 patients who underwent 44 procedures. Results: Embolization was successful on the first attempt in 87% of the patients. A second embolization was performed in four of the five unsuccessful cases, three successfully, increasing the success rate to 95%. The mean postoperative narcotic use was 27.2 mg of morphine equivalent, and 10 mg or less was required by 45% of the patients. In the 14 patients who had not also undergone a surgical procedure, the mean narcotic use was 21 mg, and 64% required 10 mg or less. Only 15% of the patients developed fever, which resolved within 2 days in all cases. Leukocytosis was seen in 47%. Follow-up creatinine and hypertension information was available in 16 and 18 patients, respectively. After a mean follow-up of 269 days, only one patient had a clinically significant rise in the creatinine concentration. After a mean follow-up of 496 days, two patients had new-onset hypertension. There was no statistically significant difference in the success rate, narcotic use, complications, creatinine concentrations, or the likelihood of fever, leukocytosis, or hypertension according to the indication for embolization or the agent used. Use of a microcatheter was associated with less parenchymal loss, and decreased parenchymal loss was associated with a significant reduction of narcotic use. Conclusions: Renal embolization is a highly effective and well-tolerated procedure in a variety of urologic conditions. The indications and material used did not have a significant effect on the outcome. Reducing parenchymal loss can significantly reduce morbidity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)385-391
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Endourology
Volume17
Issue number6
StatePublished - Aug 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Therapeutic Embolization
Urologic Diseases
Morbidity
Kidney
Narcotics
Creatinine
Leukocytosis
Hypertension
Fever
Morphine

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Urology

Cite this

Jacobson, A. I., Amukele, S. A., Marcovich, R., Shapiro, O., Shetty, R., Aldana, J. P., ... Siegel, D. N. (2003). Efficacy and morbidity of therapeutic renal embolization in the spectrum of urologic disease. Journal of Endourology, 17(6), 385-391.

Efficacy and morbidity of therapeutic renal embolization in the spectrum of urologic disease. / Jacobson, Avi I.; Amukele, S. A.; Marcovich, Robert; Shapiro, O.; Shetty, R.; Aldana, J. P.; Lee, Benjamin R.; Smith, Arthur D.; Siegel, D. N.

In: Journal of Endourology, Vol. 17, No. 6, 08.2003, p. 385-391.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jacobson, AI, Amukele, SA, Marcovich, R, Shapiro, O, Shetty, R, Aldana, JP, Lee, BR, Smith, AD & Siegel, DN 2003, 'Efficacy and morbidity of therapeutic renal embolization in the spectrum of urologic disease', Journal of Endourology, vol. 17, no. 6, pp. 385-391.
Jacobson AI, Amukele SA, Marcovich R, Shapiro O, Shetty R, Aldana JP et al. Efficacy and morbidity of therapeutic renal embolization in the spectrum of urologic disease. Journal of Endourology. 2003 Aug;17(6):385-391.
Jacobson, Avi I. ; Amukele, S. A. ; Marcovich, Robert ; Shapiro, O. ; Shetty, R. ; Aldana, J. P. ; Lee, Benjamin R. ; Smith, Arthur D. ; Siegel, D. N. / Efficacy and morbidity of therapeutic renal embolization in the spectrum of urologic disease. In: Journal of Endourology. 2003 ; Vol. 17, No. 6. pp. 385-391.
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