Effects of telecommunication media on interpersonal self-disclosure and deceptive behaviors

A. Rodney Wellens, Eva Szeli, Marci Gittes

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Two experiments were conducted that independently examined the effects of communication media upon self-disclosure and deceptive behaviors. Results of experiment I indicated that subjects engaged in a greater volume of self-disclosure in the face-to-face condition than in the computer messaging condition, with an intermediate amount disclosed in the telephone condition. Experiment II results indicated that subjects' willingness to engage in deceptive behaviors did not vary much between communication conditions. Subjects were more willing to present themselves in an exaggerated positive light when engaged in face-to-face interaction and more willing to portray themselves in an exaggerated negative manner while being interviewed over a computer messaging system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1994
EventProceedings of the 38th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Part 2 (of 2) - Nashville, TN, USA
Duration: Oct 24 1994Oct 28 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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