Effects of Sugar Availability on the Blood-Feeding Behavior of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera: Culicidae)

Susanne C. Straif, John C Beier

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

41 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Blood-feeding behavior and survivorship of individual Anopheles gambiae Giles females were observed daily in cohorts with either access to sugar (n = 76) or without sugar (n = 80). Individual mosquitoes were allowed to feed daily on an anesthetized mouse. Mosquitoes provided with sugar lived on average almost 3 d longer than females without sugar (19.0 versus 16.2 d). After stratification by age, mosquitoes in the youngest (5-12 d) and middle (13-19 d) age strata showed no differences in blood-feeding patterns relative to sugar availability. However, mosquitoes from the oldest age group and no access to sugar had more total blood feeds than long-lived females (≥20 d) with access to sugar (9.8 versus 6.5). Furthermore, mosquitoes ≥20 d old and without sugar available had a higher blood-feeding frequency than females that had sugar available (0.36 versus 0.25 blood meals per female per day). The enhanced blood-feeding capability among older sugar-deprived An. gambiae emphasized the close association between sugar-feeding and blood-feeding behavior and the potential consequences for the transmission of malaria parasites and other pathogens.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)608-612
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Medical Entomology
Volume33
Issue number4
StatePublished - Jul 1 1996
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Anopheles gambiae
Feeding Behavior
Culicidae
Diptera
feeding behavior
sugars
blood
Malaria
Meals
Blood Glucose
sugar feeding
Parasites
Survival Rate
Age Groups
feeding frequency
blood meal
malaria
survival rate

Keywords

  • Anopheles gambiae
  • Blood feeding
  • Sugar feeding
  • Survivorship

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Insect Science
  • veterinary(all)

Cite this

Effects of Sugar Availability on the Blood-Feeding Behavior of Anopheles gambiae (Diptera : Culicidae). / Straif, Susanne C.; Beier, John C.

In: Journal of Medical Entomology, Vol. 33, No. 4, 01.07.1996, p. 608-612.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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