Effects of retroviral infections on immune function in African-American intravenous drug users

Nancy G. Klimas, John Page, Roberto Patarca, Dale Chitwood, Robert Morgan, Mary Ann Fletcher

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To determine the effect of retrovirus infection and co-infection, and intravenous substance use, on immune function in African-Americans. Design: A cohort of South Florida street-recruited African-American intravenous drug users formed the study population. The cohort consisted of 90 HIV-negative & human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-negative, one HIV-negative & HTLV-I-positive, 11 HIV-negative & HTLV-II-positive, 79 HIV-positive & HTLV-negative, one HIV-positive & HTLV-I-positive and 21 HIV-positive & HTLV-II-positive individuals. The results reported are for the cross-sectional, baseline assessment of immune parameters. Methods: Lymphocyte phenotypic distributions and functional markers, including proliferative response to mitogens and natural killer cell cytotoxicity, were determined. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels were determined as a measure of B-cell activity. Results: HTLV-II infection was associated with increases in CDS lymphocyte count and serum Ig, but with no other significant immunologic changes. The distribution of CD4 and CDS percentages, CD4: CD8 ratio, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) reactivity, IgA and IgC for the four retrovirus serostatus groups suggested the possibility of interactive effects in the co-infected group, as demonstrated by a trend toward lower medians for CD4 and for PHA and PWM response and higher medians for IgG, IgA and CD8. Retrovirus-seronegative intravenous drug users had significantly impaired immune status compared with non-drug-using control individuals. Conclusions: Immunologic dysfunction attributable to HTLV-II infection was minor compared with HIV infection in this population. Study subjects who were co-infected with HIV and HTLV demonstrated more impairment of immune function than individuals with single retrovirus infections.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-335
Number of pages5
JournalAIDS
Volume7
Issue number3
StatePublished - Mar 1 1993

Fingerprint

Drug Users
African Americans
Human T-lymphotropic virus 2
HIV
Infection
Viruses
Retroviridae Infections
Pokeweed Mitogens
Phytohemagglutinins
Virus Diseases
Retroviridae
Immunoglobulin A
Immunoglobulins
CD4-CD8 Ratio
Lymphocyte Count
Serum
Coinfection
Mitogens
Natural Killer Cells
Population

Keywords

  • Co-infection
  • Human T-lymphotropic virus
  • Immune function
  • Intravenous substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology
  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

Klimas, N. G., Page, J., Patarca, R., Chitwood, D., Morgan, R., & Fletcher, M. A. (1993). Effects of retroviral infections on immune function in African-American intravenous drug users. AIDS, 7(3), 331-335.

Effects of retroviral infections on immune function in African-American intravenous drug users. / Klimas, Nancy G.; Page, John; Patarca, Roberto; Chitwood, Dale; Morgan, Robert; Fletcher, Mary Ann.

In: AIDS, Vol. 7, No. 3, 01.03.1993, p. 331-335.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Klimas, NG, Page, J, Patarca, R, Chitwood, D, Morgan, R & Fletcher, MA 1993, 'Effects of retroviral infections on immune function in African-American intravenous drug users', AIDS, vol. 7, no. 3, pp. 331-335.
Klimas NG, Page J, Patarca R, Chitwood D, Morgan R, Fletcher MA. Effects of retroviral infections on immune function in African-American intravenous drug users. AIDS. 1993 Mar 1;7(3):331-335.
Klimas, Nancy G. ; Page, John ; Patarca, Roberto ; Chitwood, Dale ; Morgan, Robert ; Fletcher, Mary Ann. / Effects of retroviral infections on immune function in African-American intravenous drug users. In: AIDS. 1993 ; Vol. 7, No. 3. pp. 331-335.
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AB - Objectives: To determine the effect of retrovirus infection and co-infection, and intravenous substance use, on immune function in African-Americans. Design: A cohort of South Florida street-recruited African-American intravenous drug users formed the study population. The cohort consisted of 90 HIV-negative & human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV)-negative, one HIV-negative & HTLV-I-positive, 11 HIV-negative & HTLV-II-positive, 79 HIV-positive & HTLV-negative, one HIV-positive & HTLV-I-positive and 21 HIV-positive & HTLV-II-positive individuals. The results reported are for the cross-sectional, baseline assessment of immune parameters. Methods: Lymphocyte phenotypic distributions and functional markers, including proliferative response to mitogens and natural killer cell cytotoxicity, were determined. Serum immunoglobulin (Ig) levels were determined as a measure of B-cell activity. Results: HTLV-II infection was associated with increases in CDS lymphocyte count and serum Ig, but with no other significant immunologic changes. The distribution of CD4 and CDS percentages, CD4: CD8 ratio, phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and pokeweed mitogen (PWM) reactivity, IgA and IgC for the four retrovirus serostatus groups suggested the possibility of interactive effects in the co-infected group, as demonstrated by a trend toward lower medians for CD4 and for PHA and PWM response and higher medians for IgG, IgA and CD8. Retrovirus-seronegative intravenous drug users had significantly impaired immune status compared with non-drug-using control individuals. Conclusions: Immunologic dysfunction attributable to HTLV-II infection was minor compared with HIV infection in this population. Study subjects who were co-infected with HIV and HTLV demonstrated more impairment of immune function than individuals with single retrovirus infections.

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