Effects of mastectomy versus lumpectomy on emotional adjustment to breast cancer

A prospective study of the first year postsurgery

Christina Pozo, Charles S Carver, Victoria Noriega, Suzanne D. Harris, David S. Robinson, Alfred S. Ketcham, Adrian Legaspi, Frederick L Moffat, Kimberley C. Clark

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

126 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: Procedure (mastectomy v lumpectomy) and choice of procedure were examined as predictors of adjustment to breast cancer in a prospective study of the experiences of the first year after surgery. Patients and Methods: Breast cancer patients were interviewed the day before surgery, 10 days after surgery, and at the 3-month, 6-month, and 12-month follow-ups. Patients included 24 women who received mastectomy on strong recommendation, 24 who chose mastectomy for other reasons, and 15 who chose lumpectomy. Subjective well-being was assessed in terms of mood disturbance, perceived quality of Iife, life satisfaction, marital satisfaction, perceptions of social support, and self-rated adjustment. Results: Surgical groups differed in well-being in only one respect: lumpectomy patients reported a higher-quality sex life at 6 and 12 months postsurgery than mastectomy patients. Choice of surgical procedure predicted higher levels of life satisfaction at 3 months. Conclusion: The lack of difference between surgical groups in areas other than sexual adjustment replicates previous findings, but extends them by (1) using a fully prospective design, (2) providing data on the period surrounding the surgery (as well as later periods), and (3) examining a broader range of indices of well-being than usual.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1292-1298
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Clinical Oncology
Volume10
Issue number8
StatePublished - Dec 1 1992

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Segmental Mastectomy
Mastectomy
Social Adjustment
Prospective Studies
Breast Neoplasms
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Quality of Life
Social Support
Emotional Adjustment

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research
  • Oncology

Cite this

Pozo, C., Carver, C. S., Noriega, V., Harris, S. D., Robinson, D. S., Ketcham, A. S., ... Clark, K. C. (1992). Effects of mastectomy versus lumpectomy on emotional adjustment to breast cancer: A prospective study of the first year postsurgery. Journal of Clinical Oncology, 10(8), 1292-1298.

Effects of mastectomy versus lumpectomy on emotional adjustment to breast cancer : A prospective study of the first year postsurgery. / Pozo, Christina; Carver, Charles S; Noriega, Victoria; Harris, Suzanne D.; Robinson, David S.; Ketcham, Alfred S.; Legaspi, Adrian; Moffat, Frederick L; Clark, Kimberley C.

In: Journal of Clinical Oncology, Vol. 10, No. 8, 01.12.1992, p. 1292-1298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pozo, C, Carver, CS, Noriega, V, Harris, SD, Robinson, DS, Ketcham, AS, Legaspi, A, Moffat, FL & Clark, KC 1992, 'Effects of mastectomy versus lumpectomy on emotional adjustment to breast cancer: A prospective study of the first year postsurgery', Journal of Clinical Oncology, vol. 10, no. 8, pp. 1292-1298.
Pozo, Christina ; Carver, Charles S ; Noriega, Victoria ; Harris, Suzanne D. ; Robinson, David S. ; Ketcham, Alfred S. ; Legaspi, Adrian ; Moffat, Frederick L ; Clark, Kimberley C. / Effects of mastectomy versus lumpectomy on emotional adjustment to breast cancer : A prospective study of the first year postsurgery. In: Journal of Clinical Oncology. 1992 ; Vol. 10, No. 8. pp. 1292-1298.
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