Effects of integrated trauma treatment on outcomes in a racially/ethnically diverse sample of women in urban community-based substance abuse treatment

Hortensia Amaro, Jianyu Dai, Sandra Arévalo, Andrea Acevedo, Atsushi Matsumoto, Rita Nieves, Guillermo Prado

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

63 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study presents findings from a quasiexperimental, nonequivalent, group-design study with repeated measures that explored the effects of integrated trauma-informed services on the severity of substance abuse, mental health, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptomatology among women with histories of trauma in urban, community-based substance abuse treatment. The study also explored if the model of integrated services was equally beneficial for women of various racial/ethnic groups. Participants in the study were 342 women receiving substance abuse treatment in intervention and comparison sites. Results indicated that at 6 and 12 month follow-ups, those in the trauma-informed intervention group, in contrast to the comparison group, had significantly better outcomes in drug abstinence rates in the past 30 days as well as in mental health and PTSD symptomatology. Results also showed that, overall, integrated services were beneficial for women across the different racial/ethnic groups in substance abuse treatment, although some differences appear to exist across racial/ethnic groups in improving addiction severity and mental health and PTSD symptomatology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)508-522
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Urban Health
Volume84
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2007

Keywords

  • Co-occurring disorders
  • Race/Ethnic differences
  • Substance abuse treatment
  • Trauma
  • Women

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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