Effects of harman and norharman on the mutagenicity and binding to DNA of benzo[a]pyrene metabolites in vitro and on aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase induction in cell culture

Roy C. Levitt, Catherine Legraverend, Daniel W. Nebert, Olavi Pelkonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Harman and norharman, two β-carboline derivatives known to exist in certain foods and to be formed during pyrolysis of tobacco and meat, were tested for mutagenic activity in the presence of benzo[a]pyrene, mouse liver enzymes, and Salmonella typhimurium TA98 in vitro. Both harman and norharman inhibit benzo[a]pyrene mutagenicity, benzo[a]pyrene metabolism (as measured by aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity), and the binding of all benzo[a]pyrene metabolites to DNA in vitro. Moreover, harman and norharman are quite toxic to cultures of hepatoma-derived H-4-II-E and Hepa-1 established cell lines and therefore were found to be very weak inducers of aryl hydrocarbon hydroxylase activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1167-1175
Number of pages9
JournalBiochemical and biophysical research communications
Volume79
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 21 1977
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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