Effects of daily stressors on the psychological and biological well-being of spouses of persons with mild cognitive impairment

Jyoti Savla, Karen A. Roberto, Rosemary Blieszner, Matthew Cox, Frank Gwazdauskas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives:This research documents spousal accounts of daily symptoms and behaviors of their husbands or wives with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and assesses how MCI-related symptoms and care needs are associated with spouse care partners' psychological well-being and biomarkers of physiological wear and tear. Method:Thirty spouse care partners participated in a 7-day diary study and reported on behavior problems associated with MCI as well as daily stressors and strains they experienced. They also provided saliva samples on 4 of the study days. Results:Multilevel models revealed daily variability and change in psychological affect and the diurnal cortisol rhythm. Daily primary stressors, everyday secondary strains, and marital interactions predicted these changes. Discussion:The findings document the negative physiological effects of having a spouse with MCI and provide new details on probable causes of psychological and biological distress. They shed light on MCI-specific interventions to address couples' needs before severe disease progression occurs that could interfere with spouses' ability to provide home-based care and support.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)653-664
Number of pages12
JournalJournals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences
Volume66 B
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Spouses
spouse
well-being
Psychology
human being
wear and tear
husband
wife
Aptitude
Home Care Services
Circadian Rhythm
Disease
Tears
Saliva
cause
Disease Progression
Hydrocortisone
Cognitive Dysfunction
ability
interaction

Keywords

  • Cortisol
  • Daily diaries
  • Distress
  • Mild cognitive impairment
  • Stress process model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geriatrics and Gerontology
  • Gerontology
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Effects of daily stressors on the psychological and biological well-being of spouses of persons with mild cognitive impairment. / Savla, Jyoti; Roberto, Karen A.; Blieszner, Rosemary; Cox, Matthew; Gwazdauskas, Frank.

In: Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences, Vol. 66 B, No. 6, 11.2011, p. 653-664.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Savla, Jyoti ; Roberto, Karen A. ; Blieszner, Rosemary ; Cox, Matthew ; Gwazdauskas, Frank. / Effects of daily stressors on the psychological and biological well-being of spouses of persons with mild cognitive impairment. In: Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences. 2011 ; Vol. 66 B, No. 6. pp. 653-664.
@article{81e2a893d9874b0880195e736ff2b824,
title = "Effects of daily stressors on the psychological and biological well-being of spouses of persons with mild cognitive impairment",
abstract = "Objectives:This research documents spousal accounts of daily symptoms and behaviors of their husbands or wives with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and assesses how MCI-related symptoms and care needs are associated with spouse care partners' psychological well-being and biomarkers of physiological wear and tear. Method:Thirty spouse care partners participated in a 7-day diary study and reported on behavior problems associated with MCI as well as daily stressors and strains they experienced. They also provided saliva samples on 4 of the study days. Results:Multilevel models revealed daily variability and change in psychological affect and the diurnal cortisol rhythm. Daily primary stressors, everyday secondary strains, and marital interactions predicted these changes. Discussion:The findings document the negative physiological effects of having a spouse with MCI and provide new details on probable causes of psychological and biological distress. They shed light on MCI-specific interventions to address couples' needs before severe disease progression occurs that could interfere with spouses' ability to provide home-based care and support.",
keywords = "Cortisol, Daily diaries, Distress, Mild cognitive impairment, Stress process model",
author = "Jyoti Savla and Roberto, {Karen A.} and Rosemary Blieszner and Matthew Cox and Frank Gwazdauskas",
year = "2011",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1093/geronb/gbr041",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "66 B",
pages = "653--664",
journal = "Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences",
issn = "1079-5014",
publisher = "Gerontological Society of America",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of daily stressors on the psychological and biological well-being of spouses of persons with mild cognitive impairment

AU - Savla, Jyoti

AU - Roberto, Karen A.

AU - Blieszner, Rosemary

AU - Cox, Matthew

AU - Gwazdauskas, Frank

PY - 2011/11

Y1 - 2011/11

N2 - Objectives:This research documents spousal accounts of daily symptoms and behaviors of their husbands or wives with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and assesses how MCI-related symptoms and care needs are associated with spouse care partners' psychological well-being and biomarkers of physiological wear and tear. Method:Thirty spouse care partners participated in a 7-day diary study and reported on behavior problems associated with MCI as well as daily stressors and strains they experienced. They also provided saliva samples on 4 of the study days. Results:Multilevel models revealed daily variability and change in psychological affect and the diurnal cortisol rhythm. Daily primary stressors, everyday secondary strains, and marital interactions predicted these changes. Discussion:The findings document the negative physiological effects of having a spouse with MCI and provide new details on probable causes of psychological and biological distress. They shed light on MCI-specific interventions to address couples' needs before severe disease progression occurs that could interfere with spouses' ability to provide home-based care and support.

AB - Objectives:This research documents spousal accounts of daily symptoms and behaviors of their husbands or wives with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and assesses how MCI-related symptoms and care needs are associated with spouse care partners' psychological well-being and biomarkers of physiological wear and tear. Method:Thirty spouse care partners participated in a 7-day diary study and reported on behavior problems associated with MCI as well as daily stressors and strains they experienced. They also provided saliva samples on 4 of the study days. Results:Multilevel models revealed daily variability and change in psychological affect and the diurnal cortisol rhythm. Daily primary stressors, everyday secondary strains, and marital interactions predicted these changes. Discussion:The findings document the negative physiological effects of having a spouse with MCI and provide new details on probable causes of psychological and biological distress. They shed light on MCI-specific interventions to address couples' needs before severe disease progression occurs that could interfere with spouses' ability to provide home-based care and support.

KW - Cortisol

KW - Daily diaries

KW - Distress

KW - Mild cognitive impairment

KW - Stress process model

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80054889624&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80054889624&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1093/geronb/gbr041

DO - 10.1093/geronb/gbr041

M3 - Article

C2 - 21734229

AN - SCOPUS:80054889624

VL - 66 B

SP - 653

EP - 664

JO - Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences

JF - Journals of Gerontology - Series B Psychological Sciences and Social Sciences

SN - 1079-5014

IS - 6

ER -