Effects of cochlear implants on young, deaf children's development: Longitudinal analyses of behavioral regulation, attention and parenting in a national sample

Alexandra Quittner, Ivette Cejas, David H. Barker, Michael F. Hoffman

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

This is a review of the largest, longitudinal multisite study of the effects of cochlear implants on young, deaf children's development. Data published to date on 188 deaf and 97 hearing children indicate that prior to cochlear implantation, deaf children have higher rates of behavior problems, deficits in visual selective attention, and parents report high levels of context-specific parenting stress. Videotaped parent-child interactions suggested that parents of deaf vs. hearing children had lower levels of sensitivity. Post-implantation, children made impressive gains in oral language which were directly related to baseline levels of maternal sensitivity and use of facilitative language techniques. Importantly, our results indicate that this surgical procedure should be accompanied by parenting interventions that increase sensitive parenting, reduce parenting stress, and foster a strong parent-child relationship.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCochlear Implants: Technological Advances, Psychological/Social Impacts and Long-Term Effectiveness
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages17-28
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)9781633214873, 9781633214866
StatePublished - Jul 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

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    Quittner, A., Cejas, I., Barker, D. H., & Hoffman, M. F. (2014). Effects of cochlear implants on young, deaf children's development: Longitudinal analyses of behavioral regulation, attention and parenting in a national sample. In Cochlear Implants: Technological Advances, Psychological/Social Impacts and Long-Term Effectiveness (pp. 17-28). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..