Effects of clorazepate, diazepam, and oxazepam on a laboratory measurement of aggression in men

Amy G Weisman, M. E. Berman, S. P. Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of three benzodiazepines on human aggressive behavior were examined in 44 medically healthy men. Volunteers were administered either placebo, 10 mg diazepam, 15 mg chlorazepate, or 50 mg oxazepam orally using double-blind procedures. Approximately 90 min after drug ingestion, participants were given the opportunity to administer electric shocks to an increasingly provocative fictitious opponent during a competitive reaction-time task. Aggression was defined as tile level of shock the participant was willing to administer to the opponent. Results support the notion that diazepam (but not all benzodiazepines) can elicit aggressive behavior under controlled, laboratory conditions. Implications regarding the clinical use of various benzodiazepines for the tranquilization of potentially assaultive patients are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)183-188
Number of pages6
JournalInternational Clinical Psychopharmacology
Volume13
Issue number4
StatePublished - 1998
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Oxazepam
Diazepam
Aggression
Benzodiazepines
Shock
Clorazepate Dipotassium
Volunteers
Eating
Placebos
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Keywords

  • Aggression
  • Benzodiazepines
  • Human
  • Laboratory measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutics(all)

Cite this

Effects of clorazepate, diazepam, and oxazepam on a laboratory measurement of aggression in men. / Weisman, Amy G; Berman, M. E.; Taylor, S. P.

In: International Clinical Psychopharmacology, Vol. 13, No. 4, 1998, p. 183-188.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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