Effects of background field-of-view and depth-plane on the oculogyral illusion

Fred H. Previc, Kennith W. Stevens, Nadeem Ghani, David Ludwig

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined the effects of background field-of-view and depth-plane on the oculogyral illusion. Seven subjects viewed a stationary fixation stimulus during the postrotatory interval following a 45-sec. constant-velocity chair rotation. The duration of the illusory movement of the fixation stimulus during the postrotatory interval was measured, along with the duration of the illusion of whole-body rotation (known as the somatogyral illusion) and the duration of the subject's slow-phase vestibular nystagmus. Subjects viewed the fixation stimulus by itself in a No-background condition or when surrounded by six background fields formed by the combination of two fields-of-view (35° and 115°) and three depth-planes (near, coplanar, and far). The different background fields inhibited the oculogyral illusion relative to the No-background condition but did not differ statistically from each other. The somatogyral durations better matched the oculogyral ones than did nystagmus decay, especially when a background field was present. These results suggest that the oculogyral illusion is more related to the experience of whole-body rotation than to oculomotor mechanisms and that the inhibitory effect of a background scene is only modestly affected by its field-of-view and depth-plane.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)867-878
Number of pages12
JournalPerceptual and Motor Skills
Volume93
Issue number3 PART 1
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

Cite this

Previc, F. H., Stevens, K. W., Ghani, N., & Ludwig, D. (2001). Effects of background field-of-view and depth-plane on the oculogyral illusion. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 93(3 PART 1), 867-878.

Effects of background field-of-view and depth-plane on the oculogyral illusion. / Previc, Fred H.; Stevens, Kennith W.; Ghani, Nadeem; Ludwig, David.

In: Perceptual and Motor Skills, Vol. 93, No. 3 PART 1, 01.12.2001, p. 867-878.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Previc, FH, Stevens, KW, Ghani, N & Ludwig, D 2001, 'Effects of background field-of-view and depth-plane on the oculogyral illusion', Perceptual and Motor Skills, vol. 93, no. 3 PART 1, pp. 867-878.
Previc FH, Stevens KW, Ghani N, Ludwig D. Effects of background field-of-view and depth-plane on the oculogyral illusion. Perceptual and Motor Skills. 2001 Dec 1;93(3 PART 1):867-878.
Previc, Fred H. ; Stevens, Kennith W. ; Ghani, Nadeem ; Ludwig, David. / Effects of background field-of-view and depth-plane on the oculogyral illusion. In: Perceptual and Motor Skills. 2001 ; Vol. 93, No. 3 PART 1. pp. 867-878.
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