Effects of Argon laser radiation on aortic endothelial cells

Early membrane changes and proliferative response

Dido Franceschi, Debra Graham, J. Jeffrey Alexander, Karl Koehler

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Membrane fluidity, transmembrane signaling responses, and proliferative characteristics of endothelial cells were studied to characterize biochemical and molecular changes after treatment with argon laser energy. Bovine aortic endothelial cells grown in monolayers were irradiated at 50, 100, and 200 J with an argon laser (wavelength, 488 and 514 nm). Proliferation, assayed by [3H]thymidine incorporation, was measured daily for 6 days. An initial lag phase was observed for irradiated cells when compared to nonirradiated controls (P < 0.03), with eventual recovery by the third day. Membrane fluidity, determined by fluorescence anisotropy, was measured 1 hr after irradiation. A decrease in static rotational motion of 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH) was noted in irradiated versus nonirradiated cells indicating a decrease in membrane fluidity (P < 0.02). Dynamic studies of intracellular calcium and pH flux utilizing fluorescent probes demonstrated a preserved response to mitogenic stimulation. An increase in intracellular Ca2+ with a concomitant alkalinization of the intracellular milieu was observed in irradiated and non-irradiated cells in response to stimulation with endothelial cell growth factor (ECGF). These responses resemble those characterized for other mitogens. Argon laser energy applied to aortic endothelial cells decreases membrane fluidity early after irradiation. These alterations probably cause the initial lag observed in their proliferative response; however, the capacity to respond to exogenous mitogenic stimulation is maintained.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)584-587
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Surgical Research
Volume46
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1989
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Membrane Fluidity
Argon
Lasers
Endothelial Cells
Cell Membrane
Radiation
Endothelial Growth Factors
Diphenylhexatriene
Fluorescence Polarization
Fluorescent Dyes
Mitogens
Thymidine
Calcium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Effects of Argon laser radiation on aortic endothelial cells : Early membrane changes and proliferative response. / Franceschi, Dido; Graham, Debra; Alexander, J. Jeffrey; Koehler, Karl.

In: Journal of Surgical Research, Vol. 46, No. 6, 01.01.1989, p. 584-587.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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