Effects of Adriamycin on rat heart cells in culture: Increased accumulation and nucleoli fragmentation in cardiac muscle v. non-muscle cells

Theodore Lampidis, Lincoln V. Johnson, Mervyn Israel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Primary cultures from neonatal rat hearts consist of morphologically distinguishable cardiac muscle and non-muscle cells. The relative fluorescence intensity and nucleolar effects of Adriamycin (ADR) have been studied in these different cell types by fluorescence and phase-contrast microscopy. In cultures exposed to ADR (10 μg/ml) for 30 min, or continuously for 24 h, the intensity of drug-specific fluorescence was significantly greater in the nuclei of muscle, as compared to non-muscle cells. Consistent with these differences in cytofluorescence, nucleolar fragmentation was observed in muscle cells 24 h after a 30-min exposure to ADR, whereas non-muscle cell nucleoli remained intact. With N-trifluoroacetyladriamycin-14-valerate (AD 32), a potent ADR analog, fluorescence was observed in the cytoplasm of both muscle and non-muscle cells; no difference in the intensity of fluorescence between these two cell types was detected. Based on these observations, we believe that drug-induced nucleolar fragmentation in cardiac muscle cells results from higher ADR levels than those achieved in non-muscle cells, and that these differences may have relevance with respect to anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity in vivo.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)913-924
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology
Volume13
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1981
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Doxorubicin
Myocardium
valrubicin
Cell Culture Techniques
Fluorescence
Cell Nucleolus
Phase-Contrast Microscopy
Muscles
Anthracyclines
Cardiac Myocytes
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Muscle Cells
Cytoplasm

Keywords

  • AD 32
  • Adriamycin
  • Cardiotoxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

Effects of Adriamycin on rat heart cells in culture : Increased accumulation and nucleoli fragmentation in cardiac muscle v. non-muscle cells. / Lampidis, Theodore; Johnson, Lincoln V.; Israel, Mervyn.

In: Journal of Molecular and Cellular Cardiology, Vol. 13, No. 10, 01.01.1981, p. 913-924.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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