Effects of a summer temperature regime representative of a global warming scenario on growth and protein synthesis in hardwater- and softwater-acclimated juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

Scott D. Reid, J. J. Dockray, T. K. Linton, D. G. McDonald, C. M. Wood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

1. 1. Growth, appetite, gross conversion efficiency and protein turnover rates of liver, gills and white muscle were measured in juvenile rainbow trout chronically exposed (90 days) to soft and hardwater at two temperatures (ambient, ambient temp. +2°C). The temperature regime followed that of inshore Lake Ontario over the months of June-September 1993 as temperature rose from ∼13 to 24°C. 2. 2. Over the initial 60 days of exposure, the addition of 2°C to the ambient temperature increased growth, appetite, gross conversion efficiency and protein turnover by an average of 16%. However, further exposure during the period of peak ambient temperatures, led to an average 20% reduction in growth, appetite, gross conversion efficiency and protein turnover. 3. 3. Increased rates of gill protein turnover and arguably lower rates of growth indicate that the cost of living for a trout acclimated and maintained in synthetic softwater is higher than that of hardwater fish. In addition, lower appetite in softwater fish suggest that life in softwater is itself a mild form of environmental stress.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)231-244
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Thermal Biology
Volume20
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

Fingerprint

Global Warming
Oncorhynchus mykiss
Global warming
appetite
protein metabolism
global warming
Appetite
protein synthesis
ambient temperature
Temperature
summer
Conversion efficiency
Growth
gills
temperature
Proteins
Fish
Fishes
Lake Ontario
fish

Keywords

  • appetite
  • elevated temperature
  • Fish
  • gills
  • global warming
  • growth
  • liver
  • protein synthesis
  • protein turnover
  • softwater

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • Biochemistry
  • Developmental Biology
  • Physiology

Cite this

Effects of a summer temperature regime representative of a global warming scenario on growth and protein synthesis in hardwater- and softwater-acclimated juvenile rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). / Reid, Scott D.; Dockray, J. J.; Linton, T. K.; McDonald, D. G.; Wood, C. M.

In: Journal of Thermal Biology, Vol. 20, No. 1-2, 01.01.1995, p. 231-244.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "1. 1. Growth, appetite, gross conversion efficiency and protein turnover rates of liver, gills and white muscle were measured in juvenile rainbow trout chronically exposed (90 days) to soft and hardwater at two temperatures (ambient, ambient temp. +2°C). The temperature regime followed that of inshore Lake Ontario over the months of June-September 1993 as temperature rose from ∼13 to 24°C. 2. 2. Over the initial 60 days of exposure, the addition of 2°C to the ambient temperature increased growth, appetite, gross conversion efficiency and protein turnover by an average of 16{\%}. However, further exposure during the period of peak ambient temperatures, led to an average 20{\%} reduction in growth, appetite, gross conversion efficiency and protein turnover. 3. 3. Increased rates of gill protein turnover and arguably lower rates of growth indicate that the cost of living for a trout acclimated and maintained in synthetic softwater is higher than that of hardwater fish. In addition, lower appetite in softwater fish suggest that life in softwater is itself a mild form of environmental stress.",
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