Effects of a culturally specific tobacco cessation intervention among African American Quitline enrollees: A randomized controlled trial

Monica W Hooper, Kelly Carpenter, Michael Payne, Ken Resnicow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: African Americans suffer disproportionately from tobacco-related illness and have more difficulty quitting smoking than other racial/ethnic groups. Previous research indicates that African American treatment-seekers are high utilizers of tobacco quitlines, yet cessation rates via quitlines are lower relative to whites. The goal of the present study is to test the effectiveness of adding a culturally specific, video-based, adjunct to standard quitline care. It is hypothesized that the integration of an evidence-based intervention (Pathways to Freedom: Leading the Way to a Smoke-Free Community

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number123
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume18
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 10 2018
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Tobacco Use Cessation
African Americans
Tobacco
Randomized Controlled Trials
Ethnic Groups
Smoke
Smoking
Research
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • Cessation
  • Culturally specific interventions
  • Disparities
  • Smoking
  • Tobacco
  • Video-based interventions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Effects of a culturally specific tobacco cessation intervention among African American Quitline enrollees : A randomized controlled trial. / Hooper, Monica W; Carpenter, Kelly; Payne, Michael; Resnicow, Ken.

In: BMC Public Health, Vol. 18, No. 1, 123, 10.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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