Effectiveness of Group Wheelchair Skills Training for People With Spinal Cord Injury: A Randomized Controlled Trial

Lynn A. Worobey, R. Lee Kirby, Allen W. Heinemann, Emily A. Krobot, Trevor A. Dyson-Hudson, Rachel E Cowan, Jessica Presperin Pedersen, Mary Shea, Michael L. Boninger

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To assess the effectiveness of group wheelchair skills training to elicit improvements in wheelchair skills. Design: Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Setting: Four Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems Centers. Participants: Manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (N=114). Intervention: Six 90-minute group Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) classes or two 1-hour active control sessions with 6 to 10 people per group. Main Outcome Measures: Baseline (t1) and 1-month follow-up (t2) Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q) (Version 4.2) for capacity and performance and Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) score. Results: Follow-up was completed by 79 participants (WSTP: n=36, active control: n=43). No differences were found between missing and complete cases. Many users were highly skilled at baseline with a WST-Q capacity interquartile range of 77% to 97%. There were no differences between groups at baseline in WST-Q measures or demographics. Compared with the active control group, the WSTP group improved in WST-Q capacity advanced score (P=.02) but not in WST-Q capacity or WST-Q performance total scores (P=.068 and P=.873, respectively). The average GAS score (0% at t1) for the WSTP group at t2 was 65.6%±34.8%. Higher GAS scores and WST-Q capacity scores were found for those who attended more classes and had lower baseline skills. Conclusions: Group training can improve advanced wheelchair skills capacity and facilitate achievement of individually set goals. Lower skill levels at baseline and increased attendance were correlated with greater improvement.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2016

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Wheelchairs
Spinal Cord Injuries
Randomized Controlled Trials
Education
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • Motor skills
  • Rehabilitation
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Wheelchairs

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rehabilitation
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Effectiveness of Group Wheelchair Skills Training for People With Spinal Cord Injury : A Randomized Controlled Trial. / Worobey, Lynn A.; Kirby, R. Lee; Heinemann, Allen W.; Krobot, Emily A.; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A.; Cowan, Rachel E; Presperin Pedersen, Jessica; Shea, Mary; Boninger, Michael L.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, 2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Worobey, Lynn A. ; Kirby, R. Lee ; Heinemann, Allen W. ; Krobot, Emily A. ; Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A. ; Cowan, Rachel E ; Presperin Pedersen, Jessica ; Shea, Mary ; Boninger, Michael L. / Effectiveness of Group Wheelchair Skills Training for People With Spinal Cord Injury : A Randomized Controlled Trial. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2016.
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abstract = "Objective: To assess the effectiveness of group wheelchair skills training to elicit improvements in wheelchair skills. Design: Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Setting: Four Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems Centers. Participants: Manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (N=114). Intervention: Six 90-minute group Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) classes or two 1-hour active control sessions with 6 to 10 people per group. Main Outcome Measures: Baseline (t1) and 1-month follow-up (t2) Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q) (Version 4.2) for capacity and performance and Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) score. Results: Follow-up was completed by 79 participants (WSTP: n=36, active control: n=43). No differences were found between missing and complete cases. Many users were highly skilled at baseline with a WST-Q capacity interquartile range of 77{\%} to 97{\%}. There were no differences between groups at baseline in WST-Q measures or demographics. Compared with the active control group, the WSTP group improved in WST-Q capacity advanced score (P=.02) but not in WST-Q capacity or WST-Q performance total scores (P=.068 and P=.873, respectively). The average GAS score (0{\%} at t1) for the WSTP group at t2 was 65.6{\%}±34.8{\%}. Higher GAS scores and WST-Q capacity scores were found for those who attended more classes and had lower baseline skills. Conclusions: Group training can improve advanced wheelchair skills capacity and facilitate achievement of individually set goals. Lower skill levels at baseline and increased attendance were correlated with greater improvement.",
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AU - Worobey, Lynn A.

AU - Kirby, R. Lee

AU - Heinemann, Allen W.

AU - Krobot, Emily A.

AU - Dyson-Hudson, Trevor A.

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AU - Presperin Pedersen, Jessica

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N2 - Objective: To assess the effectiveness of group wheelchair skills training to elicit improvements in wheelchair skills. Design: Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Setting: Four Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems Centers. Participants: Manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (N=114). Intervention: Six 90-minute group Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) classes or two 1-hour active control sessions with 6 to 10 people per group. Main Outcome Measures: Baseline (t1) and 1-month follow-up (t2) Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q) (Version 4.2) for capacity and performance and Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) score. Results: Follow-up was completed by 79 participants (WSTP: n=36, active control: n=43). No differences were found between missing and complete cases. Many users were highly skilled at baseline with a WST-Q capacity interquartile range of 77% to 97%. There were no differences between groups at baseline in WST-Q measures or demographics. Compared with the active control group, the WSTP group improved in WST-Q capacity advanced score (P=.02) but not in WST-Q capacity or WST-Q performance total scores (P=.068 and P=.873, respectively). The average GAS score (0% at t1) for the WSTP group at t2 was 65.6%±34.8%. Higher GAS scores and WST-Q capacity scores were found for those who attended more classes and had lower baseline skills. Conclusions: Group training can improve advanced wheelchair skills capacity and facilitate achievement of individually set goals. Lower skill levels at baseline and increased attendance were correlated with greater improvement.

AB - Objective: To assess the effectiveness of group wheelchair skills training to elicit improvements in wheelchair skills. Design: Randomized double-blinded controlled trial. Setting: Four Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems Centers. Participants: Manual wheelchair users with spinal cord injury (N=114). Intervention: Six 90-minute group Wheelchair Skills Training Program (WSTP) classes or two 1-hour active control sessions with 6 to 10 people per group. Main Outcome Measures: Baseline (t1) and 1-month follow-up (t2) Wheelchair Skills Test Questionnaire (WST-Q) (Version 4.2) for capacity and performance and Goal Attainment Scale (GAS) score. Results: Follow-up was completed by 79 participants (WSTP: n=36, active control: n=43). No differences were found between missing and complete cases. Many users were highly skilled at baseline with a WST-Q capacity interquartile range of 77% to 97%. There were no differences between groups at baseline in WST-Q measures or demographics. Compared with the active control group, the WSTP group improved in WST-Q capacity advanced score (P=.02) but not in WST-Q capacity or WST-Q performance total scores (P=.068 and P=.873, respectively). The average GAS score (0% at t1) for the WSTP group at t2 was 65.6%±34.8%. Higher GAS scores and WST-Q capacity scores were found for those who attended more classes and had lower baseline skills. Conclusions: Group training can improve advanced wheelchair skills capacity and facilitate achievement of individually set goals. Lower skill levels at baseline and increased attendance were correlated with greater improvement.

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