Effect of kidney transplantation on outcomes among patients with hepatitis C

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Abstract

The long-term outcome of kidney transplantation in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and end stage renal disease (ESRD) is not well described. We retrospectively identified 230 HCV-infected patients using enzyme immunoassay and nucleic acid testing obtained during the transplant evaluation. Of 207 patients who had a liver biopsy before transplant, 44 underwent 51 follow-up liver biopsies at approximately 5-year intervals either while on the waitlist for a kidney or after kidney transplantation. Advanced fibrosis was present in 10% of patients biopsied, identifying a population that may warrant consideration for combined liver-kidney transplantation. Kidney transplantation does not seem to accelerate liver injury; 77% of kidney recipients who underwent follow-up biopsies showed stable or improved liver histology. There was a higher risk for death during the first 6 months after transplant, but undergoing transplantation conferred a long-term survival advantage over remaining on the waitlist, which was evident by 6 months after transplant (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.62). Furthermore, the risk for death resulting from infection was significantly higher during the first 6 months after transplant (HR, 26.6; 95% CI, 5.01 to 141.3), whereas there was an early (≤6 months) and sustained decrease in the risk for cardiovascular death (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.47). In summary, these data suggest the importance of liver biopsy before transplant and show that kidney transplantation confers a long-term survival benefit among HCV-infected patients with ESRD compared with remaining on the waitlist. Nevertheless, the higher incidence of early infection-related deaths after transplant calls for further study to determine the optimal immunosuppressive protocol.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1152-1160
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of the American Society of Nephrology
Volume22
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011

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Hepatitis C
Kidney Transplantation
Transplants
Hepacivirus
Liver
Biopsy
Chronic Kidney Failure
Kidney
Survival
Immunosuppressive Agents
Infection
Immunoenzyme Techniques
Liver Transplantation
Nucleic Acids
Histology
Fibrosis
Transplantation
Incidence
Wounds and Injuries
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

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title = "Effect of kidney transplantation on outcomes among patients with hepatitis C",
abstract = "The long-term outcome of kidney transplantation in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and end stage renal disease (ESRD) is not well described. We retrospectively identified 230 HCV-infected patients using enzyme immunoassay and nucleic acid testing obtained during the transplant evaluation. Of 207 patients who had a liver biopsy before transplant, 44 underwent 51 follow-up liver biopsies at approximately 5-year intervals either while on the waitlist for a kidney or after kidney transplantation. Advanced fibrosis was present in 10{\%} of patients biopsied, identifying a population that may warrant consideration for combined liver-kidney transplantation. Kidney transplantation does not seem to accelerate liver injury; 77{\%} of kidney recipients who underwent follow-up biopsies showed stable or improved liver histology. There was a higher risk for death during the first 6 months after transplant, but undergoing transplantation conferred a long-term survival advantage over remaining on the waitlist, which was evident by 6 months after transplant (HR, 0.32; 95{\%} CI, 0.17 to 0.62). Furthermore, the risk for death resulting from infection was significantly higher during the first 6 months after transplant (HR, 26.6; 95{\%} CI, 5.01 to 141.3), whereas there was an early (≤6 months) and sustained decrease in the risk for cardiovascular death (HR, 0.20; 95{\%} CI, 0.08 to 0.47). In summary, these data suggest the importance of liver biopsy before transplant and show that kidney transplantation confers a long-term survival benefit among HCV-infected patients with ESRD compared with remaining on the waitlist. Nevertheless, the higher incidence of early infection-related deaths after transplant calls for further study to determine the optimal immunosuppressive protocol.",
author = "David Roth and Jeffrey Gaynor and Reddy, {K. Rajender} and Gaetano Ciancio and Junichiro Sageshima and Warren Kupin and Giselle Guerra and Chen, {Linda J} and Burke, {George W}",
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T1 - Effect of kidney transplantation on outcomes among patients with hepatitis C

AU - Roth, David

AU - Gaynor, Jeffrey

AU - Reddy, K. Rajender

AU - Ciancio, Gaetano

AU - Sageshima, Junichiro

AU - Kupin, Warren

AU - Guerra, Giselle

AU - Chen, Linda J

AU - Burke, George W

PY - 2011/6/1

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N2 - The long-term outcome of kidney transplantation in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and end stage renal disease (ESRD) is not well described. We retrospectively identified 230 HCV-infected patients using enzyme immunoassay and nucleic acid testing obtained during the transplant evaluation. Of 207 patients who had a liver biopsy before transplant, 44 underwent 51 follow-up liver biopsies at approximately 5-year intervals either while on the waitlist for a kidney or after kidney transplantation. Advanced fibrosis was present in 10% of patients biopsied, identifying a population that may warrant consideration for combined liver-kidney transplantation. Kidney transplantation does not seem to accelerate liver injury; 77% of kidney recipients who underwent follow-up biopsies showed stable or improved liver histology. There was a higher risk for death during the first 6 months after transplant, but undergoing transplantation conferred a long-term survival advantage over remaining on the waitlist, which was evident by 6 months after transplant (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.62). Furthermore, the risk for death resulting from infection was significantly higher during the first 6 months after transplant (HR, 26.6; 95% CI, 5.01 to 141.3), whereas there was an early (≤6 months) and sustained decrease in the risk for cardiovascular death (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.47). In summary, these data suggest the importance of liver biopsy before transplant and show that kidney transplantation confers a long-term survival benefit among HCV-infected patients with ESRD compared with remaining on the waitlist. Nevertheless, the higher incidence of early infection-related deaths after transplant calls for further study to determine the optimal immunosuppressive protocol.

AB - The long-term outcome of kidney transplantation in patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) and end stage renal disease (ESRD) is not well described. We retrospectively identified 230 HCV-infected patients using enzyme immunoassay and nucleic acid testing obtained during the transplant evaluation. Of 207 patients who had a liver biopsy before transplant, 44 underwent 51 follow-up liver biopsies at approximately 5-year intervals either while on the waitlist for a kidney or after kidney transplantation. Advanced fibrosis was present in 10% of patients biopsied, identifying a population that may warrant consideration for combined liver-kidney transplantation. Kidney transplantation does not seem to accelerate liver injury; 77% of kidney recipients who underwent follow-up biopsies showed stable or improved liver histology. There was a higher risk for death during the first 6 months after transplant, but undergoing transplantation conferred a long-term survival advantage over remaining on the waitlist, which was evident by 6 months after transplant (HR, 0.32; 95% CI, 0.17 to 0.62). Furthermore, the risk for death resulting from infection was significantly higher during the first 6 months after transplant (HR, 26.6; 95% CI, 5.01 to 141.3), whereas there was an early (≤6 months) and sustained decrease in the risk for cardiovascular death (HR, 0.20; 95% CI, 0.08 to 0.47). In summary, these data suggest the importance of liver biopsy before transplant and show that kidney transplantation confers a long-term survival benefit among HCV-infected patients with ESRD compared with remaining on the waitlist. Nevertheless, the higher incidence of early infection-related deaths after transplant calls for further study to determine the optimal immunosuppressive protocol.

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