Effect of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells on Cochlear Function in an Experimental Rat Model

Rahul Mittal, Emre Ocak, Angela Zhu, Mario M. Perdomo, Stefanie A. Pena, Jeenu Mittal, Jorge Bohorquez, Adrien Eshraghi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is an emerging treatment modality for various human diseases. Although induced pluripotent stem cells have been explored for the restoration of hearing, the potential of MSCs as a therapeutic strategy for various cochlear insults is not precisely known. MSCs possess anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and neuroprotective properties, making them an attractive target for the treatment of inner ear disorders such as hair cell damage in response to inflammation. Most of the previous studies have used immunosuppression or the complex surgical techniques to deliver stem cells into the cochlea. However, no information is available regarding the biocompatibility and safety of MSCs in the inner ear in immunocompetent cochlea. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of non-surgical administration of rodent bone marrow derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) through transtympanic delivery on the cochlear function and to assess any adverse effects on the auditory system employing a rat model without immunosuppression. We observed that the transtympanic administration of BM-MSCs has no significant effect on the hearing thresholds as determined by auditory brainstem response and distortion product otoacoustic emissions. Histopathological examination revealed no recruitment of inflammatory leukocytes and edema in the cochlea of BM-MSCs administrated rats. The results of this study suggest that transtympanic administration of BM-MSCs is safe and can be explored in providing otoprotection against cochlear insults. Anat Rec, 2019.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAnatomical Record
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Keywords

  • auditory system
  • cochlear function
  • hearing loss
  • mesenchymal stem cell
  • rat model
  • transtympanic administration

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Biotechnology
  • Histology
  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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