Effect of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist on the hemodynamic manifestations of group B streptococcal sepsis

J. D. Vallette, R. N. Goldberg, C. Suguihara, Teresa Delmoral, Octavio V. Martinez, J. Lin, R. C. Thompson, Eduardo Bancalari

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

IL-1 is purported to be a proximal mediator in the cascade leading to septic shock. To characterize its hemodynamic effects and to ascertain whether its blockade would ameliorate the deleterious consequences of sepsis, an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) was administered to 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated piglets that received a continuous infusion of group B streptococci (GBS) (7.5 x 107 colony-forming units/kg/min). Systemic (Psa), pulmonary artery (Ppa), and wedge (Pwp) pressures and cardiac output were measured pre-GBS and every 30 min during GBS infusion. After 15 min of bacterial infusion the control group received normal saline, whereas the treatment group received a bolus of IL-1ra (40 mg/kg) followed by a continuous infusion of IL-1ra (60 μg/kg/min). In comparing IL-1ra-treated animals with controls from the 15-min GBS baseline to the succeeding septic study period (45-120 min), the following treatment effects were noted (120- min values shown): mean Psa remained elevated in treatment compared with control animals (12.7 ± 2.5 versus 9 ± 3.5 kPa; p < 0.001) as did CO (0.21 ± 0.07 versus 0.13 ± 0.08 L/min/kg; p < 0.001). Pwp decreased in the treatment compared to the control group over the study period (1 ± 0.3 versus 1.6 ± 0.7 kPa; p < 0.02). Mean Ppa and mean Pra were not different between groups over time. Median lengths of survival was significantly longer (p = 0.04) in treated (226 min) compared with control animals (150 min). These data suggest that IL-1 plays an important role in GBS sepsis and septic shock, and that IL-1ra may in part ameliorate the cardiovascular alterations associated with GBS sepsis in the neonate.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)704-708
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric Research
Volume38
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1995

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Streptococcus agalactiae
Interleukin-1 Receptors
Sepsis
Hemodynamics
Septic Shock
Interleukin-1
Control Groups
Pulmonary Wedge Pressure
Carbon Monoxide
Cardiac Output
Pulmonary Artery
Stem Cells

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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Effect of an interleukin-1 receptor antagonist on the hemodynamic manifestations of group B streptococcal sepsis. / Vallette, J. D.; Goldberg, R. N.; Suguihara, C.; Delmoral, Teresa; Martinez, Octavio V.; Lin, J.; Thompson, R. C.; Bancalari, Eduardo.

In: Pediatric Research, Vol. 38, No. 5, 01.01.1995, p. 704-708.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "IL-1 is purported to be a proximal mediator in the cascade leading to septic shock. To characterize its hemodynamic effects and to ascertain whether its blockade would ameliorate the deleterious consequences of sepsis, an IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1ra) was administered to 16 anesthetized, mechanically ventilated piglets that received a continuous infusion of group B streptococci (GBS) (7.5 x 107 colony-forming units/kg/min). Systemic (Psa), pulmonary artery (Ppa), and wedge (Pwp) pressures and cardiac output were measured pre-GBS and every 30 min during GBS infusion. After 15 min of bacterial infusion the control group received normal saline, whereas the treatment group received a bolus of IL-1ra (40 mg/kg) followed by a continuous infusion of IL-1ra (60 μg/kg/min). In comparing IL-1ra-treated animals with controls from the 15-min GBS baseline to the succeeding septic study period (45-120 min), the following treatment effects were noted (120- min values shown): mean Psa remained elevated in treatment compared with control animals (12.7 ± 2.5 versus 9 ± 3.5 kPa; p < 0.001) as did CO (0.21 ± 0.07 versus 0.13 ± 0.08 L/min/kg; p < 0.001). Pwp decreased in the treatment compared to the control group over the study period (1 ± 0.3 versus 1.6 ± 0.7 kPa; p < 0.02). Mean Ppa and mean Pra were not different between groups over time. Median lengths of survival was significantly longer (p = 0.04) in treated (226 min) compared with control animals (150 min). These data suggest that IL-1 plays an important role in GBS sepsis and septic shock, and that IL-1ra may in part ameliorate the cardiovascular alterations associated with GBS sepsis in the neonate.",
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