Effect of an inhaled glucocorticosteroid on airway mucosal blood flow in mild asthma

Jorge L. Brieva, Ignacio Danta, Adam Wanner

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Abstract

We determined airway mucosal blood flow (Q̇aw) and FEV1 before and after inhaled albuterol in 19 glucocorticosteroid (GS)-naive patients with mild intermittent asthma, and assessed the effects of a 2-wk course of fluticasone propionate (FP; 440 μg daily) on these parameters. Twelve healthy nonsmokers served as controls. Baseline Q̇aw was 55.5 ± 0.7 μl/min/ml (mean ± SE) in the asthmatic subjects and 44.2 ± 0.7 μl/min/ml in the controls; the respective FEV1 values were 2.8 ± 0.2 L and 3.4 ± 0.2 L (p < 0.01 for both parameters). Albuterol increased Q̇aw by 27 ± 3% in the control subjects (p 0.01) but had no effect on Q̇aw in the asthmatic subjects; it increased FEV1 by 7 ± 1% and 6 ± 1% in the two groups, respectively. Q̇aw decreased to 49.2 ± 0.8 μl/min/ml (p < 0.05 versus baseline), and the Q̇aw responsiveness to albuterol was restored (+21 ± 2%; p < 0.05) in the asthmatic subjects after FP. Eleven asthmatic subjects stopped using FP at this time; 2 wk later, their Q̇aw returned to baseline (55.2 ± 0.9 μl/min/ml) and they lost the Q̇aw responsiveness to albuterol. Mean (± SE) FEV1 and FEV1 responsiveness to albuterol were not affected by FP. The GS-sensitive increase in Q̇aw and its hyporesponsiveness to albuterol in asthmatic subjects may be consequences of airway inflammation.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)293-296
Number of pages4
JournalAmerican Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine
Volume161
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 31 2000

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Albuterol
Asthma
Inflammation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine

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Effect of an inhaled glucocorticosteroid on airway mucosal blood flow in mild asthma. / Brieva, Jorge L.; Danta, Ignacio; Wanner, Adam.

In: American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, Vol. 161, No. 1, 31.01.2000, p. 293-296.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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