Economic evaluation of breast cancer screening: A review

David W. Brown, Michael T. French, Maurice E. Schweitzer, Kerry Anne McGeary, Clyde B. McCoy, Steven G. Ullman

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

PURPOSE: The authors provide a review of the economic evaluation literature of breast cancer screening and identify important trends and gaps in the literature. OVERVIEW: Healthcare resources are limited and economic evaluation plays a critical role in resource allocation, healthcare policy, and clinical decision. Many economic evaluations of medical practice, however, are unreliable and do not use appropriate analytic techniques. Three important trends were observed. First, two economic evaluation methods are dominant. Second, a wide range of cost estimates exists across studies. Third, a lack of standardization exists across studies with regard to basic economic evaluation principles. These findings should be considered when conducting future research, analyzing economic evaluations of breast cancer screening and developing clinical guidelines. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Concerns about cost containment in healthcare make it necessary for physicians and clinical administrators to take an active role in resource allocation decisions at the clinical level. For instance, the recent debate on the proper age to begin annual mammography screening involves both resource allocation and clinical issues. Thus, it is important for physicians and clinical administrators to be familiar with the economic evaluation literature of breast cancer screening, economic evaluation methodology, and the associated shortcomings of published estimates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-33
Number of pages6
JournalCancer practice
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1999

Keywords

  • Breast cancer
  • Economic evaluation
  • Literature review

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Nursing(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Economic evaluation of breast cancer screening: A review'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this