Economic development in Tibet under the People's Republic of China

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

After 20 years of central government efforts that include generous state subsidies, the Tibet Autonomous Region remains China's poorest administrative unit. Growth rates over the past decade have exceeded the national average, while the average Tibetan is better fed and clothed than in the past. However, development has been extensive, resulting from higher subsidies, rather than intensive. Economic rates of return are low and dropping, raising fears that the TAR is becoming more dependent on external aid. There are also questions about the distribution of benefits between both Han versus Tibetans and urban versus rural dwellers; the impact of development projects on the environment; and their deleterious effects on traditional Tibetan culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-430
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Contemporary China
Volume12
Issue number36
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2003

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Tibet
subsidy
economic development
traditional culture
China
development project
economics
aid
anxiety
distribution
rate
effect
central government

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Development
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

Cite this

Economic development in Tibet under the People's Republic of China. / Dreyer, June Teufel.

In: Journal of Contemporary China, Vol. 12, No. 36, 08.2003, p. 411-430.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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