Ecological and evolutionary implications of the larval transport and reproductive strategy of bluefish Pomatomus saltatrix

J. A. Hare, R. K. Cowen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

64 Scopus citations

Abstract

The current view of bluefish life history holds that there are two distinct spawning events along the US east coast which result in the recruitment of two juvenile cohorts to estuaries of the Middle Atlantic Bight. This two-spawning hypothesis is examined through an analysis of gonosomatic indices, larval abundances and larval distributions. Data in fact suggest that bluefish spawn continuously from about March to at least September. This continuous-spawning hypothesis raises the problem of which processes could act between spawning and estuarine recruitment to create the appearance of two juvenile cohorts. A model is developed which predicts that offspring spawned in the middle of the spawning season will have a lower probability of recruitment, thereby creating a bimodal pattern of offspring survival. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalMarine Ecology Progress Series
Volume98
Issue number1-2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1993

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Aquatic Science
  • Ecology

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