Eat better & move more: A community-based program designed to improve diets and increase physical activity among older Americans

Nancy S. Wellman, Barbara Kamp, Neva J Kirk-Sanchez, Paulette M. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives. We assessed outcomes of an integrated nutrition and exercise program designed for Older Americans Act Nutrition Program participants as part of the Administration on Aging's You Can! campaign. Methods. A 10-site intervention study was conducted. Preintervention and postintervention assessments focused on nutrition and physical activity stages of change, self-reported health status, dietary intakes, physical activity, and program satisfaction. Results. Of 999 enrollees, the 620 who completed the program were aged 74.6 years on average; 82% were women, and 41% were members of racial/ethnic minority groups. Factors associated with program completion were site, health conditions, and nutrition risk. Seventy-three percent and 75% of participants, respectively, made a significant advance of 1 or more nutrition and physical activity stages of change; 24% reported improved health status. Daily intake of fruit increased 1 or more servings among 31% of participants; vegetables, 37%; and fiber, 33%. Daily steps increased 35%; blocks walked, 45%; and stairs climbed, 24%. Program satisfaction was 99%. Conclusions. This easy-to-implement program improves diets and activity levels. Local providers should offer more such programs with the goal of enabling older Americans to take simple steps toward successful aging.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)710-717
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Public Health
Volume97
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2007

Fingerprint

Exercise
Diet
Health Status
Minority Groups
Ethnic Groups
Vegetables
Fruit
Health
Stair Climbing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Eat better & move more : A community-based program designed to improve diets and increase physical activity among older Americans. / Wellman, Nancy S.; Kamp, Barbara; Kirk-Sanchez, Neva J; Johnson, Paulette M.

In: American Journal of Public Health, Vol. 97, No. 4, 01.04.2007, p. 710-717.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{44a1403ec40349349930602ab9c422eb,
title = "Eat better & move more: A community-based program designed to improve diets and increase physical activity among older Americans",
abstract = "Objectives. We assessed outcomes of an integrated nutrition and exercise program designed for Older Americans Act Nutrition Program participants as part of the Administration on Aging's You Can! campaign. Methods. A 10-site intervention study was conducted. Preintervention and postintervention assessments focused on nutrition and physical activity stages of change, self-reported health status, dietary intakes, physical activity, and program satisfaction. Results. Of 999 enrollees, the 620 who completed the program were aged 74.6 years on average; 82{\%} were women, and 41{\%} were members of racial/ethnic minority groups. Factors associated with program completion were site, health conditions, and nutrition risk. Seventy-three percent and 75{\%} of participants, respectively, made a significant advance of 1 or more nutrition and physical activity stages of change; 24{\%} reported improved health status. Daily intake of fruit increased 1 or more servings among 31{\%} of participants; vegetables, 37{\%}; and fiber, 33{\%}. Daily steps increased 35{\%}; blocks walked, 45{\%}; and stairs climbed, 24{\%}. Program satisfaction was 99{\%}. Conclusions. This easy-to-implement program improves diets and activity levels. Local providers should offer more such programs with the goal of enabling older Americans to take simple steps toward successful aging.",
author = "Wellman, {Nancy S.} and Barbara Kamp and Kirk-Sanchez, {Neva J} and Johnson, {Paulette M.}",
year = "2007",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.2105/AJPH.2006.090522",
language = "English",
volume = "97",
pages = "710--717",
journal = "American Journal of Public Health",
issn = "0090-0036",
publisher = "American Public Health Association Inc.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eat better & move more

T2 - A community-based program designed to improve diets and increase physical activity among older Americans

AU - Wellman, Nancy S.

AU - Kamp, Barbara

AU - Kirk-Sanchez, Neva J

AU - Johnson, Paulette M.

PY - 2007/4/1

Y1 - 2007/4/1

N2 - Objectives. We assessed outcomes of an integrated nutrition and exercise program designed for Older Americans Act Nutrition Program participants as part of the Administration on Aging's You Can! campaign. Methods. A 10-site intervention study was conducted. Preintervention and postintervention assessments focused on nutrition and physical activity stages of change, self-reported health status, dietary intakes, physical activity, and program satisfaction. Results. Of 999 enrollees, the 620 who completed the program were aged 74.6 years on average; 82% were women, and 41% were members of racial/ethnic minority groups. Factors associated with program completion were site, health conditions, and nutrition risk. Seventy-three percent and 75% of participants, respectively, made a significant advance of 1 or more nutrition and physical activity stages of change; 24% reported improved health status. Daily intake of fruit increased 1 or more servings among 31% of participants; vegetables, 37%; and fiber, 33%. Daily steps increased 35%; blocks walked, 45%; and stairs climbed, 24%. Program satisfaction was 99%. Conclusions. This easy-to-implement program improves diets and activity levels. Local providers should offer more such programs with the goal of enabling older Americans to take simple steps toward successful aging.

AB - Objectives. We assessed outcomes of an integrated nutrition and exercise program designed for Older Americans Act Nutrition Program participants as part of the Administration on Aging's You Can! campaign. Methods. A 10-site intervention study was conducted. Preintervention and postintervention assessments focused on nutrition and physical activity stages of change, self-reported health status, dietary intakes, physical activity, and program satisfaction. Results. Of 999 enrollees, the 620 who completed the program were aged 74.6 years on average; 82% were women, and 41% were members of racial/ethnic minority groups. Factors associated with program completion were site, health conditions, and nutrition risk. Seventy-three percent and 75% of participants, respectively, made a significant advance of 1 or more nutrition and physical activity stages of change; 24% reported improved health status. Daily intake of fruit increased 1 or more servings among 31% of participants; vegetables, 37%; and fiber, 33%. Daily steps increased 35%; blocks walked, 45%; and stairs climbed, 24%. Program satisfaction was 99%. Conclusions. This easy-to-implement program improves diets and activity levels. Local providers should offer more such programs with the goal of enabling older Americans to take simple steps toward successful aging.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33947529760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33947529760&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.2105/AJPH.2006.090522

DO - 10.2105/AJPH.2006.090522

M3 - Article

C2 - 17329647

AN - SCOPUS:33947529760

VL - 97

SP - 710

EP - 717

JO - American Journal of Public Health

JF - American Journal of Public Health

SN - 0090-0036

IS - 4

ER -