Early-Holocene greening of the Afro-Asian dust belt changed sources of mineral dust in West Asia

Arash Sharifi, Lisa N. Murphy, Ali Pourmand, Amy C Clement, Elizabeth A. Canuel, Abdolmajid Naderi Beni, Hamid A.K. Lahijani, Doriane Delanghe, Hesam Ahmady-Birgani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Production, transport and deposition of mineral dust have significant impacts on different components of the Earth systems through time and space. In modern times, dust plumes are associated with their source region(s) using satellite and land-based measurements and trajectory analysis of air masses through time. Reconstruction of past changes in the sources of mineral dust as related to changes in climate, however, must rely on the knowledge of the geochemical and mineralogical composition of modern and paleo-dust, and that of their potential source origins. In this contribution, we present a 13,000-yr record of variations in radiogenic Sr–Nd–Hf isotopes and Rare Earth Element (REE) anomalies as well as dust grain size from an ombrotrophic (rain fed) peat core in NW Iran as proxies of past changes in the sources of dust over the interior of West Asia. Our data shows that although the grain size of dust varies in a narrow range through the entire record, the geochemical fingerprint of dust particles deposited during the low-flux, early Holocene period (11,700–6,000 yr BP) is distinctly different from aerosols deposited during high dust flux periods of the Younger Dryas and the mid-late Holocene (6,000–present). Our findings indicate that the composition of mineral dust deposited at the study site changed as a function of prevailing atmospheric circulation regimes and land exposure throughout the last deglacial period and the Holocene. Simulations of atmospheric circulation over the region show the Northern Hemisphere Summer Westerly Jet was displaced poleward across the study area during the early Holocene when Northern Hemisphere insolation was higher due to the Earth's orbital configuration. This shift, coupled with lower dust emissions simulated based on greening of the Afro-Asian Dust Belt during the early Holocene likely led to potential sources in Central Asia dominating dust export to West Asia during this period. In contrast, the dominant western and southwest Asian and Eastern African sources have prevailed during the mid-Holocene to modern times.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)30-40
Number of pages11
JournalEarth and Planetary Science Letters
Volume481
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

Minerals
Dust
dust
minerals
Holocene
mineral
atmospheric circulation
Northern Hemisphere
Asia
grain size
Earth (planet)
Fluxes
trajectory analysis
peat
insolation
Incident solar radiation
Iran
Peat
air masses
rain

Keywords

  • atmospheric circulation
  • dust provenance
  • Holocene of Iran
  • Paleo-dust
  • Sr–Hf–Nd isotopes
  • West Asia

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Geophysics
  • Geochemistry and Petrology
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

Early-Holocene greening of the Afro-Asian dust belt changed sources of mineral dust in West Asia. / Sharifi, Arash; Murphy, Lisa N.; Pourmand, Ali; Clement, Amy C; Canuel, Elizabeth A.; Naderi Beni, Abdolmajid; A.K. Lahijani, Hamid; Delanghe, Doriane; Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam.

In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters, Vol. 481, 01.01.2018, p. 30-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharifi, A, Murphy, LN, Pourmand, A, Clement, AC, Canuel, EA, Naderi Beni, A, A.K. Lahijani, H, Delanghe, D & Ahmady-Birgani, H 2018, 'Early-Holocene greening of the Afro-Asian dust belt changed sources of mineral dust in West Asia', Earth and Planetary Science Letters, vol. 481, pp. 30-40. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.epsl.2017.10.001
Sharifi, Arash ; Murphy, Lisa N. ; Pourmand, Ali ; Clement, Amy C ; Canuel, Elizabeth A. ; Naderi Beni, Abdolmajid ; A.K. Lahijani, Hamid ; Delanghe, Doriane ; Ahmady-Birgani, Hesam. / Early-Holocene greening of the Afro-Asian dust belt changed sources of mineral dust in West Asia. In: Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 2018 ; Vol. 481. pp. 30-40.
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