Early depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability: The Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS)

Joshua Z. Willey, Norbelina Disla, Yeseon Park Moon, Myunghee C. Paik, Ralph L Sacco, Bernadette Boden-Albala, Mitchell S V Elkind, Clinton B Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background and Purpose-: Depression is highly prevalent after stroke and may influence recovery. We aimed to determine whether depressed mood acutely after stroke predicts subsequent disability and mortality. Methods-: As part of the Northern Manhattan Stroke Study, a population-based incident stroke case follow-up study performed in a multiethnic urban population, participants were asked about depressed mood within 7 to 10 days after stroke. Participants were followed every 6 months the first 2 years and yearly thereafter for 5 years for death and disability measured by the Barthel Index. We fitted polytomous logistic regression models using a canonical link to examine the association between depressed mood after stroke and disability comparing moderate (Barthel Index 60 to 95) and severe (Barthel Index <60) disability with no disability (Barthel Index ≥95). Cox proportional hazards models were created to examine the association between depressed mood and mortality. Results-: A question about depressed mood within 7 to 10 days after stroke was asked in 340 of 655 patients with ischemic stroke enrolled, and 139 reported that they felt depressed. In multivariate analyses controlling for sociodemographic factors, stroke severity, and medical conditions, depressed mood was associated with a greater odds of severe disability compared with no disability at 1 (OR 2.91, 95% CI 1.07 to 7.91) and 2 years (OR 3.72, 95% CI 1.29 to 10.71) after stroke. Depressed mood was not associated with all-cause mortality or vascular death. Conclusion-: Depressed mood after stroke is associated with disability but not mortality after stroke. Early screening and intervention for mood disorders after stroke may improve outcomes and requires further research.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1896-1900
Number of pages5
JournalStroke
Volume41
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2010

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Stroke
Mortality
Logistic Models
Urban Population
Mood Disorders
Proportional Hazards Models
Blood Vessels
Multivariate Analysis
Depression
Research

Keywords

  • depression
  • outcomes
  • recovery
  • stroke

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Willey, J. Z., Disla, N., Moon, Y. P., Paik, M. C., Sacco, R. L., Boden-Albala, B., ... Wright, C. B. (2010). Early depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability: The Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS). Stroke, 41(9), 1896-1900. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.583997

Early depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability : The Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS). / Willey, Joshua Z.; Disla, Norbelina; Moon, Yeseon Park; Paik, Myunghee C.; Sacco, Ralph L; Boden-Albala, Bernadette; Elkind, Mitchell S V; Wright, Clinton B.

In: Stroke, Vol. 41, No. 9, 01.09.2010, p. 1896-1900.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Willey, JZ, Disla, N, Moon, YP, Paik, MC, Sacco, RL, Boden-Albala, B, Elkind, MSV & Wright, CB 2010, 'Early depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability: The Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS)', Stroke, vol. 41, no. 9, pp. 1896-1900. https://doi.org/10.1161/STROKEAHA.110.583997
Willey, Joshua Z. ; Disla, Norbelina ; Moon, Yeseon Park ; Paik, Myunghee C. ; Sacco, Ralph L ; Boden-Albala, Bernadette ; Elkind, Mitchell S V ; Wright, Clinton B. / Early depressed mood after stroke predicts long-term disability : The Northern Manhattan Stroke Study (NOMASS). In: Stroke. 2010 ; Vol. 41, No. 9. pp. 1896-1900.
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