Early debridement of second-degree burn wounds enhances the rate of epithelization - An animal model to evaluate burn wound therapies

Stephen C. Davis, Patricia M. Mertz, Estela D. Bilevich, Alex L. Cazzaniga, William H. Eaglstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to examine the rate of epithelization of second-degree burn wounds with use of two debridement times (early versus late). Burn wounds were randomly assigned to one of the following treatment groups: (1) control, no debridement, (2) early debridement at 24 hours after burning, or (3) late debridement at 96 hours after burning. Wounds from each treatment group were harvested, incubated to allow separation of the dermis and epidermis, and then examined macroscopically for complete epithelization. On day 7 after burning, the percentage of burn wounds completely epithelized was as follows: nondebrided, 41%, 24-hour early debridement, 75%, and 96- hour late debridement, 22%. Burn wounds that were excised 24 hours after burning enhanced the rate of healing as compared to 96 hour and nondebrided burn wounds.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)558-561
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Burn Care and Rehabilitation
Volume17
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1996

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Nursing(all)
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Rehabilitation
  • Health Professions(all)

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