Eagle syndrome as a cause of transient ischemic attacks: Case report

Hamad I. Farhat, Mohamed Elhammady, Habib Ziayee, Mohammad Ali Aziz-Sultan, Roberto Heros

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Eagle syndrome is an uncommon entity but is well known in the otorhinolaryngology and oral surgery literature. This syndrome results from the compression of cranial nerves in the neck by an elongated styloid process causing unilateral cervical and facial pain. The styloid process can also cause compression of the cervical carotid arteries leading to the so-called carotid artery syndrome together with carotidynia or neurological symptoms due to flow reduction in these arteries. The authors discuss the case of a 70-year-old man who suffered from transient ischemic attacks on turning his head to the left, with immediate remission of symptoms when his head returned to the neutral position. The patient was studied with dynamic angiography, which clearly showed focal flow restriction. Once a diagnosis was made, the styloid process was removed surgically and the patient completely recovered from his symptoms. A postoperative angiogram demonstrated complete resolution of the pathology. Neurosurgeons might encounter patients with Eagle syndrome and should be aware of the symptoms and signs. Once the diagnosis is made, the treatment is clear and very effective.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)90-93
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of Neurosurgery
Volume110
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

Fingerprint

Transient Ischemic Attack
Carotid Arteries
Angiography
Head
Facial Pain
Cranial Nerves
Neck Pain
Oral Surgery
Otolaryngology
Signs and Symptoms
Neck
Arteries
Pathology
Eagle syndrome
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Dynamic angiogram
  • Eagle syndrome
  • Internal carotid artery
  • Styloid process
  • Transient ischemic attack

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Surgery

Cite this

Eagle syndrome as a cause of transient ischemic attacks : Case report. / Farhat, Hamad I.; Elhammady, Mohamed; Ziayee, Habib; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali; Heros, Roberto.

In: Journal of Neurosurgery, Vol. 110, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 90-93.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Farhat, HI, Elhammady, M, Ziayee, H, Aziz-Sultan, MA & Heros, R 2009, 'Eagle syndrome as a cause of transient ischemic attacks: Case report', Journal of Neurosurgery, vol. 110, no. 1, pp. 90-93. https://doi.org/10.3171/2008.3.17435
Farhat, Hamad I. ; Elhammady, Mohamed ; Ziayee, Habib ; Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali ; Heros, Roberto. / Eagle syndrome as a cause of transient ischemic attacks : Case report. In: Journal of Neurosurgery. 2009 ; Vol. 110, No. 1. pp. 90-93.
@article{89f27995acd146fcb35c68f549330a0e,
title = "Eagle syndrome as a cause of transient ischemic attacks: Case report",
abstract = "Eagle syndrome is an uncommon entity but is well known in the otorhinolaryngology and oral surgery literature. This syndrome results from the compression of cranial nerves in the neck by an elongated styloid process causing unilateral cervical and facial pain. The styloid process can also cause compression of the cervical carotid arteries leading to the so-called carotid artery syndrome together with carotidynia or neurological symptoms due to flow reduction in these arteries. The authors discuss the case of a 70-year-old man who suffered from transient ischemic attacks on turning his head to the left, with immediate remission of symptoms when his head returned to the neutral position. The patient was studied with dynamic angiography, which clearly showed focal flow restriction. Once a diagnosis was made, the styloid process was removed surgically and the patient completely recovered from his symptoms. A postoperative angiogram demonstrated complete resolution of the pathology. Neurosurgeons might encounter patients with Eagle syndrome and should be aware of the symptoms and signs. Once the diagnosis is made, the treatment is clear and very effective.",
keywords = "Dynamic angiogram, Eagle syndrome, Internal carotid artery, Styloid process, Transient ischemic attack",
author = "Farhat, {Hamad I.} and Mohamed Elhammady and Habib Ziayee and Aziz-Sultan, {Mohammad Ali} and Roberto Heros",
year = "2009",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3171/2008.3.17435",
language = "English",
volume = "110",
pages = "90--93",
journal = "Journal of Neurosurgery",
issn = "0022-3085",
publisher = "American Association of Neurological Surgeons",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Eagle syndrome as a cause of transient ischemic attacks

T2 - Case report

AU - Farhat, Hamad I.

AU - Elhammady, Mohamed

AU - Ziayee, Habib

AU - Aziz-Sultan, Mohammad Ali

AU - Heros, Roberto

PY - 2009/1/1

Y1 - 2009/1/1

N2 - Eagle syndrome is an uncommon entity but is well known in the otorhinolaryngology and oral surgery literature. This syndrome results from the compression of cranial nerves in the neck by an elongated styloid process causing unilateral cervical and facial pain. The styloid process can also cause compression of the cervical carotid arteries leading to the so-called carotid artery syndrome together with carotidynia or neurological symptoms due to flow reduction in these arteries. The authors discuss the case of a 70-year-old man who suffered from transient ischemic attacks on turning his head to the left, with immediate remission of symptoms when his head returned to the neutral position. The patient was studied with dynamic angiography, which clearly showed focal flow restriction. Once a diagnosis was made, the styloid process was removed surgically and the patient completely recovered from his symptoms. A postoperative angiogram demonstrated complete resolution of the pathology. Neurosurgeons might encounter patients with Eagle syndrome and should be aware of the symptoms and signs. Once the diagnosis is made, the treatment is clear and very effective.

AB - Eagle syndrome is an uncommon entity but is well known in the otorhinolaryngology and oral surgery literature. This syndrome results from the compression of cranial nerves in the neck by an elongated styloid process causing unilateral cervical and facial pain. The styloid process can also cause compression of the cervical carotid arteries leading to the so-called carotid artery syndrome together with carotidynia or neurological symptoms due to flow reduction in these arteries. The authors discuss the case of a 70-year-old man who suffered from transient ischemic attacks on turning his head to the left, with immediate remission of symptoms when his head returned to the neutral position. The patient was studied with dynamic angiography, which clearly showed focal flow restriction. Once a diagnosis was made, the styloid process was removed surgically and the patient completely recovered from his symptoms. A postoperative angiogram demonstrated complete resolution of the pathology. Neurosurgeons might encounter patients with Eagle syndrome and should be aware of the symptoms and signs. Once the diagnosis is made, the treatment is clear and very effective.

KW - Dynamic angiogram

KW - Eagle syndrome

KW - Internal carotid artery

KW - Styloid process

KW - Transient ischemic attack

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=60749135324&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=60749135324&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3171/2008.3.17435

DO - 10.3171/2008.3.17435

M3 - Article

C2 - 18821836

AN - SCOPUS:60749135324

VL - 110

SP - 90

EP - 93

JO - Journal of Neurosurgery

JF - Journal of Neurosurgery

SN - 0022-3085

IS - 1

ER -