DSM-IV field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents

Benjamin B. Lahey, Brooks Applegate, Russell A. Barkley, Barry Garfinkel, Keith McBurnett, Lynn Kerdyk, Laurence Greenhill, George W. Hynd, Paul J. Frick, Jeffrey Newcorn, Joseph Biederman, Thomas Ollendick, Elizabeth L. Hart, Dorcas Perez, Irwin Waldman, David Shaffer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

148 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The purpose of the field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder was to select valid diagnostic thresholds for these disorders and to compare the psychometric properties of DSM-IV criteria for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder with previous DSM diagnostic formulations. Method: Structured diagnostic interviews, standardized clinician's validation diagnoses, and multiple measures of impairment were obtained for 440 clinic-referred children and adolescents aged 4-17 years. Results: A diagnostic threshold of four symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder optimized identification of impaired children, improved agreement somewhat with the clinician's validation diagnosis, and had somewhat better test-retest agreement than DSM-III-R. In the case of conduct disorder, the optimal time window for ascertainment of symptoms was clarified. A diagnostic threshold of three symptoms of conduct disorder maximized accurate identification of impaired children and agreement with the clinician's validation diagnosis and resulted in slightly better test-retest agreement than DSM-III-R. Compared with the DSM-III-R definition, the DSM-IV definition of oppositional defiant disorder was somewhat more prevalent, but the prevalence of conduct disorder was essentially unchanged. Conclusions: DSM-IV definitions of oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder are somewhat better than DSM-III-R definitions in terms of internal consistency and test-retest agreement, and the validity of the DSM-IV definition of oppositional defiant disorder is slightly better than that of DSM-III-R.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1163-1171
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume151
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1 1994
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Attention Deficit and Disruptive Behavior Disorders
Conduct Disorder
Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders
Psychometrics
Interviews

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Lahey, B. B., Applegate, B., Barkley, R. A., Garfinkel, B., McBurnett, K., Kerdyk, L., ... Shaffer, D. (1994). DSM-IV field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents. American Journal of Psychiatry, 151(8), 1163-1171.

DSM-IV field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents. / Lahey, Benjamin B.; Applegate, Brooks; Barkley, Russell A.; Garfinkel, Barry; McBurnett, Keith; Kerdyk, Lynn; Greenhill, Laurence; Hynd, George W.; Frick, Paul J.; Newcorn, Jeffrey; Biederman, Joseph; Ollendick, Thomas; Hart, Elizabeth L.; Perez, Dorcas; Waldman, Irwin; Shaffer, David.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 151, No. 8, 01.08.1994, p. 1163-1171.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lahey, BB, Applegate, B, Barkley, RA, Garfinkel, B, McBurnett, K, Kerdyk, L, Greenhill, L, Hynd, GW, Frick, PJ, Newcorn, J, Biederman, J, Ollendick, T, Hart, EL, Perez, D, Waldman, I & Shaffer, D 1994, 'DSM-IV field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 151, no. 8, pp. 1163-1171.
Lahey BB, Applegate B, Barkley RA, Garfinkel B, McBurnett K, Kerdyk L et al. DSM-IV field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents. American Journal of Psychiatry. 1994 Aug 1;151(8):1163-1171.
Lahey, Benjamin B. ; Applegate, Brooks ; Barkley, Russell A. ; Garfinkel, Barry ; McBurnett, Keith ; Kerdyk, Lynn ; Greenhill, Laurence ; Hynd, George W. ; Frick, Paul J. ; Newcorn, Jeffrey ; Biederman, Joseph ; Ollendick, Thomas ; Hart, Elizabeth L. ; Perez, Dorcas ; Waldman, Irwin ; Shaffer, David. / DSM-IV field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 1994 ; Vol. 151, No. 8. pp. 1163-1171.
@article{242e74335d62492eaf7354f4b1371e4f,
title = "DSM-IV field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents",
abstract = "Objective: The purpose of the field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder was to select valid diagnostic thresholds for these disorders and to compare the psychometric properties of DSM-IV criteria for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder with previous DSM diagnostic formulations. Method: Structured diagnostic interviews, standardized clinician's validation diagnoses, and multiple measures of impairment were obtained for 440 clinic-referred children and adolescents aged 4-17 years. Results: A diagnostic threshold of four symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder optimized identification of impaired children, improved agreement somewhat with the clinician's validation diagnosis, and had somewhat better test-retest agreement than DSM-III-R. In the case of conduct disorder, the optimal time window for ascertainment of symptoms was clarified. A diagnostic threshold of three symptoms of conduct disorder maximized accurate identification of impaired children and agreement with the clinician's validation diagnosis and resulted in slightly better test-retest agreement than DSM-III-R. Compared with the DSM-III-R definition, the DSM-IV definition of oppositional defiant disorder was somewhat more prevalent, but the prevalence of conduct disorder was essentially unchanged. Conclusions: DSM-IV definitions of oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder are somewhat better than DSM-III-R definitions in terms of internal consistency and test-retest agreement, and the validity of the DSM-IV definition of oppositional defiant disorder is slightly better than that of DSM-III-R.",
author = "Lahey, {Benjamin B.} and Brooks Applegate and Barkley, {Russell A.} and Barry Garfinkel and Keith McBurnett and Lynn Kerdyk and Laurence Greenhill and Hynd, {George W.} and Frick, {Paul J.} and Jeffrey Newcorn and Joseph Biederman and Thomas Ollendick and Hart, {Elizabeth L.} and Dorcas Perez and Irwin Waldman and David Shaffer",
year = "1994",
month = "8",
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "151",
pages = "1163--1171",
journal = "American Journal of Psychiatry",
issn = "0002-953X",
publisher = "American Psychiatric Association",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - DSM-IV field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder in children and adolescents

AU - Lahey, Benjamin B.

AU - Applegate, Brooks

AU - Barkley, Russell A.

AU - Garfinkel, Barry

AU - McBurnett, Keith

AU - Kerdyk, Lynn

AU - Greenhill, Laurence

AU - Hynd, George W.

AU - Frick, Paul J.

AU - Newcorn, Jeffrey

AU - Biederman, Joseph

AU - Ollendick, Thomas

AU - Hart, Elizabeth L.

AU - Perez, Dorcas

AU - Waldman, Irwin

AU - Shaffer, David

PY - 1994/8/1

Y1 - 1994/8/1

N2 - Objective: The purpose of the field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder was to select valid diagnostic thresholds for these disorders and to compare the psychometric properties of DSM-IV criteria for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder with previous DSM diagnostic formulations. Method: Structured diagnostic interviews, standardized clinician's validation diagnoses, and multiple measures of impairment were obtained for 440 clinic-referred children and adolescents aged 4-17 years. Results: A diagnostic threshold of four symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder optimized identification of impaired children, improved agreement somewhat with the clinician's validation diagnosis, and had somewhat better test-retest agreement than DSM-III-R. In the case of conduct disorder, the optimal time window for ascertainment of symptoms was clarified. A diagnostic threshold of three symptoms of conduct disorder maximized accurate identification of impaired children and agreement with the clinician's validation diagnosis and resulted in slightly better test-retest agreement than DSM-III-R. Compared with the DSM-III-R definition, the DSM-IV definition of oppositional defiant disorder was somewhat more prevalent, but the prevalence of conduct disorder was essentially unchanged. Conclusions: DSM-IV definitions of oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder are somewhat better than DSM-III-R definitions in terms of internal consistency and test-retest agreement, and the validity of the DSM-IV definition of oppositional defiant disorder is slightly better than that of DSM-III-R.

AB - Objective: The purpose of the field trials for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder was to select valid diagnostic thresholds for these disorders and to compare the psychometric properties of DSM-IV criteria for oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder with previous DSM diagnostic formulations. Method: Structured diagnostic interviews, standardized clinician's validation diagnoses, and multiple measures of impairment were obtained for 440 clinic-referred children and adolescents aged 4-17 years. Results: A diagnostic threshold of four symptoms of oppositional defiant disorder optimized identification of impaired children, improved agreement somewhat with the clinician's validation diagnosis, and had somewhat better test-retest agreement than DSM-III-R. In the case of conduct disorder, the optimal time window for ascertainment of symptoms was clarified. A diagnostic threshold of three symptoms of conduct disorder maximized accurate identification of impaired children and agreement with the clinician's validation diagnosis and resulted in slightly better test-retest agreement than DSM-III-R. Compared with the DSM-III-R definition, the DSM-IV definition of oppositional defiant disorder was somewhat more prevalent, but the prevalence of conduct disorder was essentially unchanged. Conclusions: DSM-IV definitions of oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder are somewhat better than DSM-III-R definitions in terms of internal consistency and test-retest agreement, and the validity of the DSM-IV definition of oppositional defiant disorder is slightly better than that of DSM-III-R.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0028022521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0028022521&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 8037251

AN - SCOPUS:0028022521

VL - 151

SP - 1163

EP - 1171

JO - American Journal of Psychiatry

JF - American Journal of Psychiatry

SN - 0002-953X

IS - 8

ER -