Driving toward a goal and the goal-gradient hypothesis: The impact of goal proximity on compliance rate, donation size, and fatigue

Jakob D. Jensen, Andy J. King, Nick Carcioppolo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Driving toward a goal (DTAG) is a compliance technique derived fromobserved persuasion practice (e.g., telethons) wherein the persuader utilizes a goal pitch (e.g., "Help us raise $500") and progress toward a goal (e.g., a tote board) to encourage compliance. It was postulated thatDTAGwould be more effective than legitimizing a paltry contribution (LPC) at increasing compliance rate, size, and stability. In Study 1, a fundraising field experiment (N = 840 donations) found that LPC garnered significantly more donations and DTAG garnered significantly larger donations. In Study 2, a lab experiment (N = 992 participants) found that LPC garnered more donations at Time 1, DTAG garnered more donations over time (eventually matching LPC), and LPC yielded smaller donations over time.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1881-1895
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Applied Social Psychology
Volume43
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Fatigue
Compliance
Persuasive Communication

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

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Driving toward a goal and the goal-gradient hypothesis : The impact of goal proximity on compliance rate, donation size, and fatigue. / Jensen, Jakob D.; King, Andy J.; Carcioppolo, Nick.

In: Journal of Applied Social Psychology, Vol. 43, No. 9, 2013, p. 1881-1895.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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