Dramatic decline in substance use by HIV-infected pregnant women in the United States from 1990 to 2012

Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: We aimed to describe temporal changes in substance use among HIVinfected pregnant women in the United States from 1990 to 2012. Design: Data came from two prospective cohort studies (Women and Infants Transmission Study and Surveillance Monitoring for Antiretroviral Therapy Toxicities Study) . Methods: Women were classified as using a substance during pregnancy if they selfreported use or had a positive biological sample. To account for correlation between repeated pregnancies by the same woman, generalized estimating equation models were used to test for temporal trends and evaluate predictors of substance use . Results: Over the 23-year period, substance use among the 5451 HIV-infected pregnant women sharply declined; 82% of women reported substance use during pregnancy in 1990, compared with 23% in 2012. Use of each substance decreased significantly (P

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-123
Number of pages7
JournalAIDS
Volume29
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - 2015

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Pregnant Women
HIV
Pregnancy
Cohort Studies
Prospective Studies
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Epidemiology
  • HIV
  • Pregnancy
  • Substance abuse

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Dramatic decline in substance use by HIV-infected pregnant women in the United States from 1990 to 2012. / Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study.

In: AIDS, Vol. 29, No. 1, 2015, p. 117-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study. / Dramatic decline in substance use by HIV-infected pregnant women in the United States from 1990 to 2012. In: AIDS. 2015 ; Vol. 29, No. 1. pp. 117-123.
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