Double-bounce component in cross-polarimetric SAR from a new scattering target decomposition

Sang Hoon Hong, Shimon Wdowinski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Common vegetation scattering theories assume that the synthetic aperture radar (SAR) cross-polarization (cross-pol) signal represents solely volume scattering. We found that this assumption is incorrect based on SAR phase measurements acquired over the South Florida Everglades indicating that the cross-pol radar signal often samples the water surface beneath the vegetation. Based on these new observations, we propose that the cross-pol signal consists of both double-bounce and volume scattering components. The simplest multibounce scattering mechanism that generates cross-pol signal occurs by rotated dihedrals. Thus, we use the rotated dihedral mechanism to revise some of the vegetation scattering theories and develop a fourcomponent decomposition algorithm with single-bounce, co-pol double-bounce, cross-pol double-bounce, and volume scattering components. We tested the new decomposition in both urban and rural environments using RADARSAT-2 quad-pol data sets. The decomposition of the San Francisco area shows higher doublebounce scattering and reduced volume scattering in the urban area with respect to the common three-component decomposition. The decomposition of the rural Everglades area shows that the relation between volume and cross-pol double bounce depends on the vegetation density. Thus, we suggest that, when possible, SAR-based biomass estimate studies should use the volume scattering calculated by our decomposition rather than the cross-pol signal, which also contains a double-bounce component.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number6562800
Pages (from-to)3039-3051
Number of pages13
JournalIEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing
Volume52
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Synthetic aperture radar
synthetic aperture radar
scattering
Scattering
decomposition
Decomposition
vegetation
Radar measurement
Phase measurement
RADARSAT
rural area
Biomass
Radar
polarization
urban area
radar
Polarization
surface water
biomass

Keywords

  • Cross-polarization (cross-pol)
  • Everglades
  • polarimetric decomposition
  • polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (PolSAR)
  • rotated dihedral mechanism
  • volume scattering
  • wetland interferometric SAR (InSAR)

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Double-bounce component in cross-polarimetric SAR from a new scattering target decomposition. / Hong, Sang Hoon; Wdowinski, Shimon.

In: IEEE Transactions on Geoscience and Remote Sensing, Vol. 52, No. 6, 6562800, 2014, p. 3039-3051.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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