Domains of life satisfaction in social anxiety disorder: Relation to symptoms and response to cognitive-behavioral therapy

Winnie Eng, Meredith E. Coles, Richard G. Heimberg, Steven A. Safren

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

89 Scopus citations

Abstract

A general sense of satisfaction with life has been shown to be discriminable from symptom levels and disability in clinical populations. The current study focused on the utility of identifying domains of life satisfaction in social anxiety disorder and differential changes in these domains following cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBGT). An exploratory principal axis factor analysis of the items of the Quality of Life Inventory in clients with a principal diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (N=138) yielded four domains of life satisfaction: (1) Achievement, (2) Social Functioning, (3) Personal Growth, and (4) Surroundings. Prior to treatment, clients reported dissatisfaction in the Achievement and Social Functioning domains. Further, levels of satisfaction in these domains were significantly related to severity of social anxiety and depressive symptoms. Finally, analyses of a subsample of clients completing 12-weeks of cognitive-behavioral group therapy revealed significant improvements in the Achievement and Social Functioning factors. These findings provide further support for the assertion that social anxiety disorder has important implications for clients' quality of life and that CBGT can successfully impact several domains of satisfaction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-156
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Anxiety Disorders
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Cognitive-behavioral treatment
  • Life satisfaction
  • Social anxiety

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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