Do religious and spiritual identity confer risk for hypertension via psychosocial and lifestyle factors?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The total and indirect effect of hostility on systolic and diastolic blood pressure was compared as a function of religious and spirituality identity in a nationally representative sample of 2971 adults aged 46.44 years. Structural equation modeling uncovered an indirect path from hostility to diastolic blood pressure via unhealthy behaviors and hostility to unhealthy behaviors via social isolation. Compared to a non-religious/non-spiritual reference group, the effect for unhealthy behaviors on diastolic blood pressure was greater for those endorsing some form of religious identity. However, the direction of the effect for hostility on social isolation and social isolation on unhealthy behaviors was reversed in those endorsing spiritual and religious identity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1082-1097
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2020

Keywords

  • blood pressure
  • health/lifestyle behaviors
  • hostility
  • religion/spirituality
  • social isolation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology

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