Do portfolio distortions reflect superior information or psychological biases?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Using a demographics-based proxy for smartness, we show that the portfolio distortions of smart investors reflect an informational advantage, while the distortions of dumb investors reflect psychological biases. Specifically, smart investors outperform dumb investors by about 3% annually on a risk-adjusted basis. Furthermore, among investors with high portfolio distortions, smart investors outperform passive benchmarks by 2%, and the smart-dumb performance differential is 5%. At the stock level, a portfolio of stocks with smart investor clientele outperforms the dumb clientele portfolio by 3.50% annually. These findings suggest that behavioral and information-based explanations for portfolio distortions apply to distinct subsets of investors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-45
Number of pages45
JournalJournal of Financial and Quantitative Analysis
Volume48
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

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Investors
Psychological
Clientele
Benchmark
Demographics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Finance
  • Accounting
  • Economics and Econometrics

Cite this

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