Do Pantheistic, Theistic, and Deistic Views of God Moderate the Relationship Between Financial Strain and Physical Health Status?

Neal Krause, Peter C. Hill, Kenneth I. Pargament, Gail Ironson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to see if a pantheistic view of God (i.e., God is all around us in nature), a theistic view of God (i.e., God is the creator of the universe who protects us), and a deistic view of God (i.e., God created the universe and then left people to fend for themselves) moderate the relationship between chronic financial strain and three measures of health (self-rated health, the number of chronic conditions, and functional disability). The data come from a recent nationwide survey of adults of all ages (N = 2,768). The findings suggest that neither pantheistic nor theistic views of God offset the effects of financial strain on any of the health outcomes. In contrast, the data further reveal that the relationship between ongoing economic difficulties and all three health outcomes is more pronounced for study participants who have a deistic view of God.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)19-30
Number of pages12
JournalInternational Journal for the Psychology of Religion
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Religious studies
  • Psychology(all)

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