Do noncontingent incentives increase survey response rates among mental health providers? A randomized trial comparison

Kristin M. Hawley, Jonathan R. Cook, Amanda Doss

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Surveys can be a useful tool for mental health services research. Unfortunately, clinicians typically show low response rates to surveys. To determine whether noncontingent incentives would increase responses among clinicians, we compared no incentive versus four incentives (mood magnet, $1, $2, $5) on response to a 7-page self-report survey of mental health assessment and treatment practices in a sample of 500 clinicians from the 5 largest professional guilds. Noncontingent monetary incentives significantly increased response rate compared to no incentive across all disciplines. Noncontingent monetary incentives are discussed as a cost-effective method for increasing survey response rate among mental health clinicians.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)343-348
Number of pages6
JournalAdministration and Policy in Mental Health and Mental Health Services Research
Volume36
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 7 2009
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Motivation
Mental Health
Magnets
Health Services Research
Mental Health Services
Self Report
Surveys and Questionnaires
Costs and Cost Analysis

Keywords

  • Incentives
  • Mental health services
  • Response rate
  • Survey research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health Policy
  • Phychiatric Mental Health

Cite this

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