Do clinical manifestations of resistance to thyroid hormone correlate with the functional alteration of the corresponding mutant thyroid hormone-β receptors?

Y. Hayashi, Roy E Weiss, D. H. Sarne, P. M. Yen, T. Sunthornthepvarakul, C. Marcocci, W. W. Chin, S. Refetoff

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Abstract

Resistance to thyroid hormone (RTH), a syndrome characterized by variable tissue hyposensitivity to thyroid hormone, is linked to mutations in the thyroid hormone receptor-β (TRβ) gene. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the clinical phenotypes of RTH can be translated in terms of functional impairment of the corresponding mutant TRβ. Data from 124 subjects with RTH representing 18 different mutant TRβs, showed that serum free T4 levels correlated with the degree of T3-binding impairment of the corresponding TRβ in 12 of these mutant TRβs (group I), but not in the remaining 6 (group II). In subjects from both groups studied in detail by the administration of incremental doses of T3, the degree of thyrotroph resistance to T3 correlated with the magnitude of endogenous free T4 elevation at baseline, but did not parallel the resistance of peripheral tissues. In transfection studies, all group I mutant TRβs inhibited positive transactivation by the wild type TRβs to a similar degree in the presence of 1 nmol/L T3, whereas group II mutant TRβs exerted a weaker inhibition that was not related to their T3-dependent transactivation when tested alone. Similar results were obtained with negatively regulated reporter genes. It is concluded that the clinical severity of RTH, determined by thyrotroph resistance, can be predicted from the degree of T3 binding impairment and dominant negative potency of mutant TRβs, but the degree of peripheral tissue resistance and related clinical manifestations is limited by putative genetic or environmental factors that modulate the effect of thyroid hormone.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3246-3256
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism
Volume80
Issue number11
StatePublished - 1995
Externally publishedYes

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Thyroid Hormone Resistance Syndrome
Thyroid Hormone Receptors
Thyroid Hormones
Thyrotrophs
Vascular Resistance
Transcriptional Activation
Tissue
Genes
Reporter Genes
Transfection
Phenotype
Mutation
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism

Cite this

Do clinical manifestations of resistance to thyroid hormone correlate with the functional alteration of the corresponding mutant thyroid hormone-β receptors? / Hayashi, Y.; Weiss, Roy E; Sarne, D. H.; Yen, P. M.; Sunthornthepvarakul, T.; Marcocci, C.; Chin, W. W.; Refetoff, S.

In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, Vol. 80, No. 11, 1995, p. 3246-3256.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hayashi, Y. ; Weiss, Roy E ; Sarne, D. H. ; Yen, P. M. ; Sunthornthepvarakul, T. ; Marcocci, C. ; Chin, W. W. ; Refetoff, S. / Do clinical manifestations of resistance to thyroid hormone correlate with the functional alteration of the corresponding mutant thyroid hormone-β receptors?. In: Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism. 1995 ; Vol. 80, No. 11. pp. 3246-3256.
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