Do asymmetrical differences in primate brains correspond to cerebral lateralization?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

An evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) may apply to characters expressed across species for predation and feeding, because these characters are conservative. However, the evolution of complex, polymorphic behaviors is more difficult to define as an ESS. Lateralization may be selective for certain simple traits, but lateralization of complex traits is likely the result of coadaptation of otherwise non-lateralized features.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)590-591
Number of pages2
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2005
Externally publishedYes

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evolutionarily stable strategy
primate
Primates
brain
Brain
predation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Psychology(all)
  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Do asymmetrical differences in primate brains correspond to cerebral lateralization? / Broadfield, Douglas C.

In: Behavioral and Brain Sciences, Vol. 28, No. 4, 08.2005, p. 590-591.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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