Disparity in posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis among African American pregnant women

Julia S. Seng, Laura Kohn-Wood, Melnee D. McPherson, Mickey Sperlich

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

To determine whether African American women expecting their first infant carry a disproportionate burden of posttraumatic stress disorder morbidity, we conducted a comparative analysis of cross-sectional data from the initial psychiatric interview in a prospective cohort study of posttraumatic stress disorder effects on childbearing outcomes. Participants were recruited from maternity clinics in three health systems in the Midwestern USA. Eligibility criteria were being 18 years or older, able to speak English, expecting a first infant, and less than 28 weeks gestation. Telephone interview data was collected from 1,581 women prior to 28 weeks gestation; four declined to answer racial identity items (n∈=∈1,577), 709 women self-identified as African American, 868 women did not. Measures included the Life Stressor Checklist, the National Women's Study Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Module, the Composite International Diagnostic Interview, and the Centers for Disease Control's Perinatal Risk Assessment Monitoring System survey. The 709 African American pregnant women had more trauma exposure, posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms and diagnosis, comorbidity and pregnancy substance use, and had less mental health treatment than 868 non-African Americans. Lifetime prevalence was 24.0% versus 17.1%, respectively (OR∈=∈1.5, p∈=∈0.001). Current prevalence was 13.4% versus 3.5% (OR∈=∈4.3, p∈<∈0.001). Current prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was four times higher among African American women. Their risk for PTSD did not differ by sociodemographic status, but was explained by greater trauma exposure. Traumatic stress may be an additional, addressable stress factor in birth outcome disparities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-306
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Women's Mental Health
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2011

Fingerprint

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
African Americans
Pregnant Women
Interviews
Pregnancy
Wounds and Injuries
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (U.S.)
Checklist
Psychiatry
Comorbidity
Mental Health
Cohort Studies
Cross-Sectional Studies
Parturition
Prospective Studies
Morbidity
Health

Keywords

  • African American
  • Health disparity
  • Posttraumatic stress disorder
  • Pregnancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Disparity in posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis among African American pregnant women. / Seng, Julia S.; Kohn-Wood, Laura; McPherson, Melnee D.; Sperlich, Mickey.

In: Archives of Women's Mental Health, Vol. 14, No. 4, 01.08.2011, p. 295-306.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Seng, Julia S. ; Kohn-Wood, Laura ; McPherson, Melnee D. ; Sperlich, Mickey. / Disparity in posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis among African American pregnant women. In: Archives of Women's Mental Health. 2011 ; Vol. 14, No. 4. pp. 295-306.
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