Disentangling the exposure experience: The roles of community context and report-back of environmental exposure data

Crystal Adams, Phil Brown, Rachel Morello-Frosch, Julia Green Brody, Ruthann Rudel, Ami Zota, Sarah Dunagan, Jessica Tovar, Sharyle Pattonand

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines participants' responses to receiving their results in a study of household exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds and other pollutants. The authors study how the "exposure experience"-the embodied, personal experience and understanding of chronic exposure to environmental pollutants-is shaped by community context and the report-back process itself. In addition, the authors investigate an activist, collective form of exposure experience. The authors analyze themes of expectations and learning, trust, and action. The findings reveal that while participants interpret scientific results to affirm lay knowledge of urban industrial toxics, they also absorb new information regarding other pollutant sources. By linking the public understanding of science literature to the illness and exposure experience concepts, this study unravels the complex relationship between lay experience and lay understanding of science. It also shows that to support policy development and/or social change, community-based participatory research efforts must attend to participants' understanding of science.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)180-196
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Health and Social Behavior
Volume52
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Environmental Exposure
Community-Based Participatory Research
Environmental Pollutants
Policy Making
Poisons
Social Change
Learning

Keywords

  • environmental health
  • exposure assessment
  • health social movements
  • illness experience
  • public involvement in science

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Disentangling the exposure experience : The roles of community context and report-back of environmental exposure data. / Adams, Crystal; Brown, Phil; Morello-Frosch, Rachel; Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann; Zota, Ami; Dunagan, Sarah; Tovar, Jessica; Pattonand, Sharyle.

In: Journal of Health and Social Behavior, Vol. 52, No. 2, 01.06.2011, p. 180-196.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Adams, C, Brown, P, Morello-Frosch, R, Brody, JG, Rudel, R, Zota, A, Dunagan, S, Tovar, J & Pattonand, S 2011, 'Disentangling the exposure experience: The roles of community context and report-back of environmental exposure data', Journal of Health and Social Behavior, vol. 52, no. 2, pp. 180-196. https://doi.org/10.1177/0022146510395593
Adams, Crystal ; Brown, Phil ; Morello-Frosch, Rachel ; Brody, Julia Green ; Rudel, Ruthann ; Zota, Ami ; Dunagan, Sarah ; Tovar, Jessica ; Pattonand, Sharyle. / Disentangling the exposure experience : The roles of community context and report-back of environmental exposure data. In: Journal of Health and Social Behavior. 2011 ; Vol. 52, No. 2. pp. 180-196.
@article{4920bb947adb4ef9ba54573b421ccd00,
title = "Disentangling the exposure experience: The roles of community context and report-back of environmental exposure data",
abstract = "This article examines participants' responses to receiving their results in a study of household exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds and other pollutants. The authors study how the {"}exposure experience{"}-the embodied, personal experience and understanding of chronic exposure to environmental pollutants-is shaped by community context and the report-back process itself. In addition, the authors investigate an activist, collective form of exposure experience. The authors analyze themes of expectations and learning, trust, and action. The findings reveal that while participants interpret scientific results to affirm lay knowledge of urban industrial toxics, they also absorb new information regarding other pollutant sources. By linking the public understanding of science literature to the illness and exposure experience concepts, this study unravels the complex relationship between lay experience and lay understanding of science. It also shows that to support policy development and/or social change, community-based participatory research efforts must attend to participants' understanding of science.",
keywords = "environmental health, exposure assessment, health social movements, illness experience, public involvement in science",
author = "Crystal Adams and Phil Brown and Rachel Morello-Frosch and Brody, {Julia Green} and Ruthann Rudel and Ami Zota and Sarah Dunagan and Jessica Tovar and Sharyle Pattonand",
year = "2011",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/0022146510395593",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "180--196",
journal = "Journal of Health and Social Behavior",
issn = "0022-1465",
publisher = "American Sociological Association",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Disentangling the exposure experience

T2 - The roles of community context and report-back of environmental exposure data

AU - Adams, Crystal

AU - Brown, Phil

AU - Morello-Frosch, Rachel

AU - Brody, Julia Green

AU - Rudel, Ruthann

AU - Zota, Ami

AU - Dunagan, Sarah

AU - Tovar, Jessica

AU - Pattonand, Sharyle

PY - 2011/6/1

Y1 - 2011/6/1

N2 - This article examines participants' responses to receiving their results in a study of household exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds and other pollutants. The authors study how the "exposure experience"-the embodied, personal experience and understanding of chronic exposure to environmental pollutants-is shaped by community context and the report-back process itself. In addition, the authors investigate an activist, collective form of exposure experience. The authors analyze themes of expectations and learning, trust, and action. The findings reveal that while participants interpret scientific results to affirm lay knowledge of urban industrial toxics, they also absorb new information regarding other pollutant sources. By linking the public understanding of science literature to the illness and exposure experience concepts, this study unravels the complex relationship between lay experience and lay understanding of science. It also shows that to support policy development and/or social change, community-based participatory research efforts must attend to participants' understanding of science.

AB - This article examines participants' responses to receiving their results in a study of household exposure to endocrine disrupting compounds and other pollutants. The authors study how the "exposure experience"-the embodied, personal experience and understanding of chronic exposure to environmental pollutants-is shaped by community context and the report-back process itself. In addition, the authors investigate an activist, collective form of exposure experience. The authors analyze themes of expectations and learning, trust, and action. The findings reveal that while participants interpret scientific results to affirm lay knowledge of urban industrial toxics, they also absorb new information regarding other pollutant sources. By linking the public understanding of science literature to the illness and exposure experience concepts, this study unravels the complex relationship between lay experience and lay understanding of science. It also shows that to support policy development and/or social change, community-based participatory research efforts must attend to participants' understanding of science.

KW - environmental health

KW - exposure assessment

KW - health social movements

KW - illness experience

KW - public involvement in science

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79958806558&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79958806558&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/0022146510395593

DO - 10.1177/0022146510395593

M3 - Article

C2 - 21673146

AN - SCOPUS:79958806558

VL - 52

SP - 180

EP - 196

JO - Journal of Health and Social Behavior

JF - Journal of Health and Social Behavior

SN - 0022-1465

IS - 2

ER -