Dilaudid use: trends and characteristics of users

D. C. McBride, Clyde B McCoy, J. E. Rivers, C. A. Lincoln

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

5 Scopus citations

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent of Dilaudid use and characteristics of users in a population of individuals admitted to drug treatment programs over a four-year period. It was found that the number and rate of Dilaudid use had increased from 1% of those admitted in 1974 to 10% in late 1977. In comparison to other drug users, Dilaudid users were more likely to be white and middle-class. Dilaudid users were also likely to use the drug intravenously and to obtain it by street buys and to also use heroin. Data suggest that Dilaudid use is easily integrated into a heroin-using life style and may serve as a heroin substitute, and that Dilaudid users are a population that has characteristics similar to the type described as the Southern addict.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationChemical Dependencies: Behavioral and Biomedical Issues
Pages85-100
Number of pages16
Volume4
Edition1-2
StatePublished - Dec 1 1980

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

McBride, D. C., McCoy, C. B., Rivers, J. E., & Lincoln, C. A. (1980). Dilaudid use: trends and characteristics of users. In Chemical Dependencies: Behavioral and Biomedical Issues (1-2 ed., Vol. 4, pp. 85-100)