Differentiating Autonomy From Individualism and Independence: A Self-Determination Theory Perspective on Internalization of Cultural Orientations and Well-Being

Valery Chirkov, Richard M. Ryan, Youngmee Kim, Ulas Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

On the basis of self-determination theory (R. M. Ryan & E. L. Deci, 2000) and cultural descriptions drawn from H. C. Triandis (1995), the authors hypothesized that (a) individuals from different cultures internalize different cultural practices; (b) despite these differences, the relative autonomy of individuals' motivation for those practices predicts well-being in all 4 cultures examined; and (c) horizontal practices are more readily internalized than vertical practices across all samples. Five hundred fifty-nine persons from South Korea, Russia, Turkey and the United States participated. Results supported the hypothesized relations between autonomy and well-being across cultures and gender. Results also suggested greater internalization of horizontal relative to vertical practices. Discussion focuses on the distinction between autonomy and individualism and the relative fit of cultural forms with basic psychological needs.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-110
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Personality and Social Psychology
Volume84
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2003
Externally publishedYes

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Republic of Korea
Personal Autonomy
internalization
Russia
individualism
Turkey
self-determination
Motivation
autonomy
well-being
Psychology
South Korea
human being
gender

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

Differentiating Autonomy From Individualism and Independence : A Self-Determination Theory Perspective on Internalization of Cultural Orientations and Well-Being. / Chirkov, Valery; Ryan, Richard M.; Kim, Youngmee; Kaplan, Ulas.

In: Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 84, No. 1, 01.01.2003, p. 97-110.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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