Differentiating Anxious and Depressive Self-Statements in Youth: Factor Structure of the Negative Affect Self-Statement Questionnaire among Youth Referred to an Anxiety Disorders Clinic

Julie Lerner, Steven A. Safren, Aude Henin, Melissa Warman, Richard G. Heimberg, Philip C. Kendall

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Scopus citations

Abstract

Conducted a factor analysis on the items from the Negative Affect Self-Statement Questionnaire (NASSQ; Ronan, Kendall, & Rowe, 1994). This analysis yielded 4 factors (Depressive Self-Statements, Anxiety/Somatic Self-Statements, Negative Affect Self-Statements, and Positive Affect Self-Statements) broadly consistent with both the content-specificity hypothesis (Beck & Clark, 1988) and L. A. Clark and Watson's (1991b) tripartite model of anxiety and depression. The association between children's self-talk and measures of trait anxiety and depression was also examined. Self-statements with content theoretically specific to depression were the best predictors of self-reported depressive symptoms, but the results were less clear for trait anxiety. Overall, these results provide evidence for the discriminability ofanxious and depressive self-talk in youth and for the utility of the NASSQ as a cognitive assessment instrument.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)82-93
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology
Volume28
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Clinical Psychology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Differentiating Anxious and Depressive Self-Statements in Youth: Factor Structure of the Negative Affect Self-Statement Questionnaire among Youth Referred to an Anxiety Disorders Clinic'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this