Differential effects of differing vocabulary presentations

Arlene Soffer Weiss, Charles T. Mangrum, Maria Llabre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of differing vocabulary presentations on various vocabulary and text comprehension measures were investigated. Thirty‐seven college students were assigned to either a group presented pseudowords with definitions, a group presented the same pseudowords and definitions plus adjoining context, or a control group. Subsequently, all groups read a stimulus passage containing the pseudowords. Both treatment groups outperformed the control group on two vocabulary measures; whereas, the means of the two treatment groups did not differ. Vocabulary training improved text comprehension with the multiple‐choice and retell measures being primarily sensitive to the definition presentation and secondarily sensitive to the definition plus context presentation. The cloze test was primarily sensitive to the definition plus context presentation, with the definition group performing no better than the control group on this measure.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)265-276
Number of pages12
JournalReading Research and Instruction
Volume25
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - 1986

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Vocabulary
vocabulary
Control Groups
Group
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Students
Therapeutics
stimulus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Psychology (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Differential effects of differing vocabulary presentations. / Weiss, Arlene Soffer; Mangrum, Charles T.; Llabre, Maria.

In: Reading Research and Instruction, Vol. 25, No. 4, 1986, p. 265-276.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Weiss, Arlene Soffer ; Mangrum, Charles T. ; Llabre, Maria. / Differential effects of differing vocabulary presentations. In: Reading Research and Instruction. 1986 ; Vol. 25, No. 4. pp. 265-276.
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