Differential cardiovascular changes as a function of stimulation electrode site in rabbit hypothalamus

Larry D. Sampson, Neil Schneiderman, Jeffrey Wallach, William J. Gavin, James S. Francis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Twenty chronically prepared, unanesthetized rabbits received both high-frequency (200 pulse/sec), short pulse-train (1.0 sec) and relatively low-frequency (25 pulse-sec), long pulse-train (10 sec) electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. High-frequency, short pulse-train stimulation elicited a pressor response and bradycardia at all 27 electrode sites. In contrast, three other cardiovascular response patterns were obtained following low-frequency, long pulse-train stimulation. These latter patterns reflected a medial-lateral organization of autonomic function within the hypothalamus. Whereas all 15 lateral hypothalamic placements yielded depressor responses, 7 of 12 medial hypothalamic placements yielded pressor responses and tachycardia. Cardiovascular changes following administration of selective autonomic blocking agents (e.g., phentolamine, propranolol, methylatropine) suggest that high-frequency, short pulse-train stimulation elicited a pressor response followed by a reflexive bradycardia essentially mediated by an increase in vagal restraint. In contrast, the heart rate changes observed to low-frequency, long pulse-train stimulation all appear to have been importantly influenced by changes at the heart in beta-adrenergic activity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)111-120
Number of pages10
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1977

Fingerprint

Bradycardia
Hypothalamus
Pulse
Electrodes
Autonomic Agents
Rabbits
Phentolamine
Tachycardia
Propranolol
Adrenergic Agents
Electric Stimulation
Heart Rate
methylatropine

Keywords

  • Blood pressure
  • Heart rate
  • Hypothalamus
  • Intracranial electrical stimulation
  • Selective autonomic blockade

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology (medical)
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Differential cardiovascular changes as a function of stimulation electrode site in rabbit hypothalamus. / Sampson, Larry D.; Schneiderman, Neil; Wallach, Jeffrey; Gavin, William J.; Francis, James S.

In: Physiology and Behavior, Vol. 19, No. 1, 01.01.1977, p. 111-120.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sampson, Larry D. ; Schneiderman, Neil ; Wallach, Jeffrey ; Gavin, William J. ; Francis, James S. / Differential cardiovascular changes as a function of stimulation electrode site in rabbit hypothalamus. In: Physiology and Behavior. 1977 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 111-120.
@article{650aa065f1d0467c8fcb6394db528f6e,
title = "Differential cardiovascular changes as a function of stimulation electrode site in rabbit hypothalamus",
abstract = "Twenty chronically prepared, unanesthetized rabbits received both high-frequency (200 pulse/sec), short pulse-train (1.0 sec) and relatively low-frequency (25 pulse-sec), long pulse-train (10 sec) electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. High-frequency, short pulse-train stimulation elicited a pressor response and bradycardia at all 27 electrode sites. In contrast, three other cardiovascular response patterns were obtained following low-frequency, long pulse-train stimulation. These latter patterns reflected a medial-lateral organization of autonomic function within the hypothalamus. Whereas all 15 lateral hypothalamic placements yielded depressor responses, 7 of 12 medial hypothalamic placements yielded pressor responses and tachycardia. Cardiovascular changes following administration of selective autonomic blocking agents (e.g., phentolamine, propranolol, methylatropine) suggest that high-frequency, short pulse-train stimulation elicited a pressor response followed by a reflexive bradycardia essentially mediated by an increase in vagal restraint. In contrast, the heart rate changes observed to low-frequency, long pulse-train stimulation all appear to have been importantly influenced by changes at the heart in beta-adrenergic activity.",
keywords = "Blood pressure, Heart rate, Hypothalamus, Intracranial electrical stimulation, Selective autonomic blockade",
author = "Sampson, {Larry D.} and Neil Schneiderman and Jeffrey Wallach and Gavin, {William J.} and Francis, {James S.}",
year = "1977",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/0031-9384(77)90167-6",
language = "English",
volume = "19",
pages = "111--120",
journal = "Physiology and Behavior",
issn = "0031-9384",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Differential cardiovascular changes as a function of stimulation electrode site in rabbit hypothalamus

AU - Sampson, Larry D.

AU - Schneiderman, Neil

AU - Wallach, Jeffrey

AU - Gavin, William J.

AU - Francis, James S.

PY - 1977/1/1

Y1 - 1977/1/1

N2 - Twenty chronically prepared, unanesthetized rabbits received both high-frequency (200 pulse/sec), short pulse-train (1.0 sec) and relatively low-frequency (25 pulse-sec), long pulse-train (10 sec) electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. High-frequency, short pulse-train stimulation elicited a pressor response and bradycardia at all 27 electrode sites. In contrast, three other cardiovascular response patterns were obtained following low-frequency, long pulse-train stimulation. These latter patterns reflected a medial-lateral organization of autonomic function within the hypothalamus. Whereas all 15 lateral hypothalamic placements yielded depressor responses, 7 of 12 medial hypothalamic placements yielded pressor responses and tachycardia. Cardiovascular changes following administration of selective autonomic blocking agents (e.g., phentolamine, propranolol, methylatropine) suggest that high-frequency, short pulse-train stimulation elicited a pressor response followed by a reflexive bradycardia essentially mediated by an increase in vagal restraint. In contrast, the heart rate changes observed to low-frequency, long pulse-train stimulation all appear to have been importantly influenced by changes at the heart in beta-adrenergic activity.

AB - Twenty chronically prepared, unanesthetized rabbits received both high-frequency (200 pulse/sec), short pulse-train (1.0 sec) and relatively low-frequency (25 pulse-sec), long pulse-train (10 sec) electrical stimulation of the hypothalamus. High-frequency, short pulse-train stimulation elicited a pressor response and bradycardia at all 27 electrode sites. In contrast, three other cardiovascular response patterns were obtained following low-frequency, long pulse-train stimulation. These latter patterns reflected a medial-lateral organization of autonomic function within the hypothalamus. Whereas all 15 lateral hypothalamic placements yielded depressor responses, 7 of 12 medial hypothalamic placements yielded pressor responses and tachycardia. Cardiovascular changes following administration of selective autonomic blocking agents (e.g., phentolamine, propranolol, methylatropine) suggest that high-frequency, short pulse-train stimulation elicited a pressor response followed by a reflexive bradycardia essentially mediated by an increase in vagal restraint. In contrast, the heart rate changes observed to low-frequency, long pulse-train stimulation all appear to have been importantly influenced by changes at the heart in beta-adrenergic activity.

KW - Blood pressure

KW - Heart rate

KW - Hypothalamus

KW - Intracranial electrical stimulation

KW - Selective autonomic blockade

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0017759112&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0017759112&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/0031-9384(77)90167-6

DO - 10.1016/0031-9384(77)90167-6

M3 - Article

C2 - 11803672

AN - SCOPUS:0017759112

VL - 19

SP - 111

EP - 120

JO - Physiology and Behavior

JF - Physiology and Behavior

SN - 0031-9384

IS - 1

ER -