Differences in hemoglobin a1cbetween hispanics/latinos and non-hispanic whites: An analysis of the hispanic community health study/study of latinos and the 2007-2012 national health and nutrition examination survey

M. Larissa Avilés-Santa, Lucy L. Hsu, Mario Arredondo, Andy Menke, Ellen Werner, Bharat Thyagarajan, Gerardo Heiss, Yanping Teng, Neil Schneiderman, Aida L. Giachello, Linda C. Gallo, Gregory A. Talavera, Catherine C. Cowie

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE To determine whether, after adjustment for glycemia and other selected covariates, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ) differed among adults from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American) and between Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic white adults without self-reported diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 13,083 individuals without self-reported diabetes from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled from 2008 to 2011 in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, and 2,242 non-Hispanic white adults enrolled during the 2007-2012 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We compared HbA1c levels among Hispanics/Latinos and between Hispanics/Latinos and non-Hispanic whites before and after adjustment for age, sex, fasting (FPG) and 2-h post-oral glucose tolerance test (2hPG) glucose, anthropometric measurements, and selected biochemical and hematologic variables and after stratification by diabetes status: unrecognized diabetes (FPG ≥7.1 mmol/L or 2hPG ≥11.2 mmol/L), prediabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/L or 2hPG 7.8-11.1 mmol/L), and normal glucose tolerance (FPG <5.6 mmol/L and 2hPG <7.8 mmol/L). RESULTS Adjusted mean HbA1c differed significantly across all seven groups (P < 0.001). Non-Hispanic whites had significantly lower HbA1c (P < 0.05) than each individual Hispanic/Latino heritage group. Upon stratification by diabetes status, statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) in adjusted mean HbA1c persisted across all seven groups. CONCLUSIONS HbA1c differs among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse heritage groups and between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics/Latinos after adjustment for glycemia and other covariates. The clinical significance of these differences is unknown.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1010-1017
Number of pages8
JournalDiabetes Care
Volume39
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2016

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Nutrition Surveys
Hispanic Americans
Hemoglobins
Health
Prediabetic State
Glucose

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Medicine(all)
  • Advanced and Specialized Nursing

Cite this

Differences in hemoglobin a1cbetween hispanics/latinos and non-hispanic whites : An analysis of the hispanic community health study/study of latinos and the 2007-2012 national health and nutrition examination survey. / Avilés-Santa, M. Larissa; Hsu, Lucy L.; Arredondo, Mario; Menke, Andy; Werner, Ellen; Thyagarajan, Bharat; Heiss, Gerardo; Teng, Yanping; Schneiderman, Neil; Giachello, Aida L.; Gallo, Linda C.; Talavera, Gregory A.; Cowie, Catherine C.

In: Diabetes Care, Vol. 39, No. 6, 01.06.2016, p. 1010-1017.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Avilés-Santa, ML, Hsu, LL, Arredondo, M, Menke, A, Werner, E, Thyagarajan, B, Heiss, G, Teng, Y, Schneiderman, N, Giachello, AL, Gallo, LC, Talavera, GA & Cowie, CC 2016, 'Differences in hemoglobin a1cbetween hispanics/latinos and non-hispanic whites: An analysis of the hispanic community health study/study of latinos and the 2007-2012 national health and nutrition examination survey', Diabetes Care, vol. 39, no. 6, pp. 1010-1017. https://doi.org/10.2337/dc15-2579
Avilés-Santa, M. Larissa ; Hsu, Lucy L. ; Arredondo, Mario ; Menke, Andy ; Werner, Ellen ; Thyagarajan, Bharat ; Heiss, Gerardo ; Teng, Yanping ; Schneiderman, Neil ; Giachello, Aida L. ; Gallo, Linda C. ; Talavera, Gregory A. ; Cowie, Catherine C. / Differences in hemoglobin a1cbetween hispanics/latinos and non-hispanic whites : An analysis of the hispanic community health study/study of latinos and the 2007-2012 national health and nutrition examination survey. In: Diabetes Care. 2016 ; Vol. 39, No. 6. pp. 1010-1017.
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abstract = "OBJECTIVE To determine whether, after adjustment for glycemia and other selected covariates, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ) differed among adults from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American) and between Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic white adults without self-reported diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 13,083 individuals without self-reported diabetes from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled from 2008 to 2011 in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, and 2,242 non-Hispanic white adults enrolled during the 2007-2012 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We compared HbA1c levels among Hispanics/Latinos and between Hispanics/Latinos and non-Hispanic whites before and after adjustment for age, sex, fasting (FPG) and 2-h post-oral glucose tolerance test (2hPG) glucose, anthropometric measurements, and selected biochemical and hematologic variables and after stratification by diabetes status: unrecognized diabetes (FPG ≥7.1 mmol/L or 2hPG ≥11.2 mmol/L), prediabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/L or 2hPG 7.8-11.1 mmol/L), and normal glucose tolerance (FPG <5.6 mmol/L and 2hPG <7.8 mmol/L). RESULTS Adjusted mean HbA1c differed significantly across all seven groups (P < 0.001). Non-Hispanic whites had significantly lower HbA1c (P < 0.05) than each individual Hispanic/Latino heritage group. Upon stratification by diabetes status, statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) in adjusted mean HbA1c persisted across all seven groups. CONCLUSIONS HbA1c differs among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse heritage groups and between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics/Latinos after adjustment for glycemia and other covariates. The clinical significance of these differences is unknown.",
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T1 - Differences in hemoglobin a1cbetween hispanics/latinos and non-hispanic whites

T2 - An analysis of the hispanic community health study/study of latinos and the 2007-2012 national health and nutrition examination survey

AU - Avilés-Santa, M. Larissa

AU - Hsu, Lucy L.

AU - Arredondo, Mario

AU - Menke, Andy

AU - Werner, Ellen

AU - Thyagarajan, Bharat

AU - Heiss, Gerardo

AU - Teng, Yanping

AU - Schneiderman, Neil

AU - Giachello, Aida L.

AU - Gallo, Linda C.

AU - Talavera, Gregory A.

AU - Cowie, Catherine C.

PY - 2016/6/1

Y1 - 2016/6/1

N2 - OBJECTIVE To determine whether, after adjustment for glycemia and other selected covariates, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ) differed among adults from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American) and between Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic white adults without self-reported diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 13,083 individuals without self-reported diabetes from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled from 2008 to 2011 in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, and 2,242 non-Hispanic white adults enrolled during the 2007-2012 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We compared HbA1c levels among Hispanics/Latinos and between Hispanics/Latinos and non-Hispanic whites before and after adjustment for age, sex, fasting (FPG) and 2-h post-oral glucose tolerance test (2hPG) glucose, anthropometric measurements, and selected biochemical and hematologic variables and after stratification by diabetes status: unrecognized diabetes (FPG ≥7.1 mmol/L or 2hPG ≥11.2 mmol/L), prediabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/L or 2hPG 7.8-11.1 mmol/L), and normal glucose tolerance (FPG <5.6 mmol/L and 2hPG <7.8 mmol/L). RESULTS Adjusted mean HbA1c differed significantly across all seven groups (P < 0.001). Non-Hispanic whites had significantly lower HbA1c (P < 0.05) than each individual Hispanic/Latino heritage group. Upon stratification by diabetes status, statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) in adjusted mean HbA1c persisted across all seven groups. CONCLUSIONS HbA1c differs among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse heritage groups and between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics/Latinos after adjustment for glycemia and other covariates. The clinical significance of these differences is unknown.

AB - OBJECTIVE To determine whether, after adjustment for glycemia and other selected covariates, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c ) differed among adults from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups (Central American, Cuban, Dominican, Mexican, Puerto Rican, and South American) and between Hispanic/Latino and non-Hispanic white adults without self-reported diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We performed a cross-sectional analysis of data from 13,083 individuals without self-reported diabetes from six Hispanic/Latino heritage groups, enrolled from 2008 to 2011 in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos, and 2,242 non-Hispanic white adults enrolled during the 2007-2012 cycles of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We compared HbA1c levels among Hispanics/Latinos and between Hispanics/Latinos and non-Hispanic whites before and after adjustment for age, sex, fasting (FPG) and 2-h post-oral glucose tolerance test (2hPG) glucose, anthropometric measurements, and selected biochemical and hematologic variables and after stratification by diabetes status: unrecognized diabetes (FPG ≥7.1 mmol/L or 2hPG ≥11.2 mmol/L), prediabetes (FPG 5.6-7.0 mmol/L or 2hPG 7.8-11.1 mmol/L), and normal glucose tolerance (FPG <5.6 mmol/L and 2hPG <7.8 mmol/L). RESULTS Adjusted mean HbA1c differed significantly across all seven groups (P < 0.001). Non-Hispanic whites had significantly lower HbA1c (P < 0.05) than each individual Hispanic/Latino heritage group. Upon stratification by diabetes status, statistically significant differences (P < 0.001) in adjusted mean HbA1c persisted across all seven groups. CONCLUSIONS HbA1c differs among Hispanics/Latinos of diverse heritage groups and between non-Hispanic whites and Hispanics/Latinos after adjustment for glycemia and other covariates. The clinical significance of these differences is unknown.

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