Differences in family functioning in grandparent and parent-headed households in a clinical sample of drug-using African American adolescents

Michael S. Robbins, Ervin Briones, Seth J. Schwartz, Frank R. Dillon, Victoria B. Mitrani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Grandparents play a critical role in African American families, providing support and important leadership functions. Little is known, however, about family functioning in grandparent-headed households with a drug-using adolescent. Such knowledge is particularly salient for researchers and therapists who work with drug-using adolescents and their families. Using a clinical sample of convenience, analyses were conducted to identify similarities and differences in adolescent substance use and behavior problems, family relationships, and family social ecology relationships between African American grandparent-headed (n = 12) and parent-headed (n = 54) households. Results indicated that adolescents from the 2 household types reported similar levels of problem behaviors, but that grandparents reported less delinquency with peers than did parents. Primary caregivers in grandparent-headed households reported less monitoring and supervision of peers and less within-family conflict. Implications for treatment are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)84-100
Number of pages17
JournalCultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology
Volume12
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

Keywords

  • Adolescents
  • African American
  • Drug use
  • Family
  • Grandparents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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